Zlatan Ibrahimovic joined Man United to prove haters wrong

first_imgZlatan Ibrahimovic revealed that his main motive in signing for Manchester United was to prove his “haters” wrong by conquering the Premier League.The Swedish striker arrived at Old Trafford in 2016 on a free transfer from Paris Saint-Germain and on the verge of becoming 35 years old.Due to this, questions were naturally raised over the kind of impact Ibrahimovic could make at United at that stage of his career.But the Swede quickly set about proving doubters wrong by netting 28 goals in 48 appearances for his debut campaign before suffering serious ligament damage in his right knee during a Europa League match in April 2017 against Anderlecht.Amid struggles to regain full fitness from the setback, Ibrahimovic left Old Trafford in February 2018 in favour of a move to MLS at LA Galaxy.“My challenge was, at the age I was, coming to England, where I had years of everybody was saying I wasn’t good enough,” Ibrahimovic told the club website.“I like those things because they trigger me. They give me adrenaline.“After three months, all of them were eating their own words. I needed new haters because all the old ones became my new fans!“Wherever I went before United, I won, and it was my pleasure that it happened again in England. Winning is in my DNA, I need to win – that’s my mentality. I hate losing. I’m not a bad loser, but I hate it and I love to win.“I said we would win and we won two big trophies. That speaks for itself.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“That whole first season at United was fantastic. Everything was. I really enjoyed it. The family was happy, everybody was happy, the club took care of me and made it really easy for me. I just needed to turn up, put on my football boots and perform.“When I came to United and I said I would conquer England, people were laughing at me. I wasn’t joking.”The one and only won the treble in his only full campaign at United in the Community Shield, Carabao Cup and the Europa League.And Ibrahimovic also paid tribute to the Red Devils’ supporters.He added: “The United fans are amazing. I’m not just saying that because I played for United. I know now because I’ve been on their side and I know the feeling they give you.“They really appreciated what I did and they were thankful. That is the best credit a player can get because when you do something and you get that response from the fans, it’s amazing.“They are 50 per cent of everything we do. Imagine if you played in empty stadiums… you would not play.“In Old Trafford, it was always full. Always. In every away game they always showed up, always supported.”Ibrahimovic managed 22 goals and seven assists in 26 MLS games for Galaxy in 2018 and had been strongly linked with a return to AC Milan in the January transfer window.LONDON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 26: Zlatan Ibrahimovic of Manchester United celebrates victory with the trophy after during the EFL Cup Final between Manchester United and Southampton at Wembley Stadium on February 26, 2017 in London, England. Manchester United beat Southampton 3-2. (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)last_img read more

Columbia Journalism Review Scales Back Print Version

first_imgColumbia Journalism Review announced that it will reduce its print issues from a bimonthly schedule to two issues per year, citing a need to redistribute resources between its print and digital platforms. “The cost savings—in production, mailing, art and design and just everyone’s time—are significant,” Spayd tells Folio:. “I’d say it comes between a third and half of our budget. I’m pumped up about the idea of taking those marbles and moving them over to the digital side.” With its reduced schedule, the print format will also take on a slightly modified focus, although Spayd promises that the non-profit magazine’s goals of providing high-quality watchdog coverage of the journalism industry will be unchanged. Instead of selections of several types of pieces, the two annual issues—one each in the Spring and Fall—will focus on singular, idea-driven, fundamental-to-journalism themes, says Spayd. In a letter to readers posted on CJR.org, editor-in-chief Elizabeth Spayd announced plans to boost investment in the magazine’s online operations in response to its increasingly digital audience. While print readers have steadily declined, Spayd writes, visitors to CJR.org have increased 35 percent. Spayd tells Folio: that there will be no layoffs or staff cuts involved with the transition.center_img Columbia Journalism Review will debut in its new format in Spring 2016. “We went to two print issues because we think it’s possible at that pace to make them truly special, more ambitious and more high-concept than the ones we could manage or afford on a bimonthly basis,” Spayd continues. “Rather, we’re rethinking most everyone’s job and how we can position everyone toward digital in the smartest way.”last_img read more

How Meredith Plans to Implement Live Video and Virtual Reality

first_img Whether on Facebook, Twitter, or elsewhere, live video is almost certainly the hottest new distribution channel of the summer for publishers. Immersive video experiences provided by virtual reality headsets seem to be gathering steam as well, with The New York Times Magazine, Sports Illustrated, and InStyle, among several others, already getting in on the action. Lee adds that the company is using open APIs at its studios in New York and Des Moines to ensure uniform quality and methodology across brands, further indicating that this is a company-wide strategy. A third studio, in Seattle, is scheduled to begin live video production later this year. The company wouldn’t reveal specifics about upcoming initiatives planned once the new technology has been fully implemented, but Melinda Lee, Meredith’s newly appointed SVP and GM of video, tells Folio: that the jump into the new formats comes as marketers are increasingly seeking those capabilities in publishers. The women’s publishing giant whose massive audience continues to grow — as of yesterday’s statement, the company claims to reach 102 million unduplicated women in the U.S. — announced a commitment to expand its relatively nascent Facebook Live activity into a fully-fledged “video innovation” strategy encompassing live video, virtual reality, and 360º video. “We have developed creative expertise in VR and 360º in-house and are training all of our producers on these new production technologies,” Lee tells Folio:. “We started by experimenting on more affordable cameras, but have recently made the investment in higher-end cameras, too.”center_img While Meredith seems no less bullish on the new video formats, Lee cautions that to fully realize the potential of any new medium, it is first necessary to attain a deep understanding of the technology and the ways in which audiences consume it. Yesterday, Meredith Corp. revealed that it, too, had joined the live video and virtual reality craze that seems to be sweeping the consumer publishing industry.  “In order for content creators to fully utilize all the good things that live video and VR can bring to our audiences, we need to fully dive into engagement metrics and iterate on our ability to tell a good story through these new video production technologies,” Lee tells Folio:. “Video insights are more important than ever and we have made an investment here.”More on this topic The Mistake Brands Can’t Afford to Make with Virtual Reality Magazine Publishers Begin to Embrace Virtual Reality Facebook Pays Publishers Over $50 Million to Start Using Live Video Video Programming, Channing Tatum Star at Hearst’s First-Ever NewFronts Meredith to Partner with “Fixer Upper” Stars on New Lifestyle Mag UBM Takes Several Titles Digital-Only as Strategic Shift ContinuesJust In Four More Execs Depart SourceMedia in Latest Restructuring Shanker Out, Litterick In as CEO of EnsembleIQ The Atlantic Names New Global Marketing Head | People on the Move This Just In: Magazines Are Not TV Networks TIME Names New Sales, Marketing Leads | People on the Move Meredith Corp. Makes Digital-Side Promotions | People on the MovePowered bylast_img read more

Army Leaders Highlight Readiness Shortfall Need for BRAC Round

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Fiscal constraints have forced the Army to focus on near-term readiness, putting its future capability at great risk, the service’s top civilian and military officials told lawmakers Wednesday.“We’re mortgaging our future readiness because we have to ensure success in today’s battles,” said acting Army Secretary Patrick Murphy.Murphy and Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley told the Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittee that readiness is their top priority as the Army shrinks its active-duty end-strength from 490,000 to 450,000 while fulfilling the requirements of combatant commanders around the globe, reported Army Times.The Army entered 2016 with 482,264 soldiers on active duty, leaving the force about 7,000 soldiers from reaching its goal of 475,000 troops by this coming October. The newly released FY 2017 budget calls for the service’s end strength to drop to 460,000 by Oct. 1, 2017.To free up more resources for training, the witnesses urged Congress to authorize a new round of base closures.“Let us manage your investments,” Murphy said. The service spends at least $500 million annually on excess or underutilized facilities, according to the written testimony Murphy and Milley submitted.“In short, smaller investments in Army installations without the ability to reduce excess infrastructure jeopardizes our ability to ensure long-term readiness. To continue the efficient use of resources, the Army requests congressional authority to consolidate or close excess infrastructure,” the testimony stated.Milley told one committee member that retaining 480,000 soldiers in the active force, 350,000 in the Guard and 205,000 in the Reserve would help the Army better meet its readiness goals, but he emphasized the importance of providing the necessary funding to maintain the extra troops’ proficiency in combat operations.“The short answer would be sure, I think that having increased numbers would help out with readiness, but if, and only if, we had the money to support that,” Milley said.last_img read more

Army Working to Boost Quality of Life

first_img ADC AUTHOR The Army is working on several efforts this year to enhance quality of life for military families, according to Military.com.“We enlist soldiers, but we retain families,” Army Secretary Mark Esper said this week at an Association of the United States Army event.The Army is planning to improve access to child care and reimburse the costs of spouses’ professional credentialing. It will also consider longer assignments to keep a family in a community longer.“We can stabilize the force,” Esper said. “Particularly if the spouse has a great job, if the kids are in good schools and the parents are happy, we want to reduce turmoil” caused by moving to a new duty station.Photo by AUSAlast_img

What AncestryDNA taught me about DNA privacy and the complex world of

first_img Share your voice Tags The hardest thing about having your DNA sequenced is generating a teaspoon’s worth of spit.They don’t tell you this in the marketing materials for your typical at-home DNA test kit, but producing enough saliva to fill a pen-sized tube up to its high spit mark is hard work — and strangely nerve-wracking, too.I sneak into an unused meeting room, chewing on air to generate slobber. The kit has two tubes. One, now full of my spit, and a second smaller tube with a chemical mix that stabilizes DNA. After uniting the two tubes, I stick the pale blue spit-mix into a box and mail it off to AncestryDNA, the genetics arm of the world’s largest genealogy company, Ancestry.In 2012 Ancestry launched the AncestryDNA service, which provides paying users the ability to build a timeline of their genes, search for relatives and understand what geographic regions their DNA originates from. Ancestry has sold 14 million kits since launch, and the number continues to grow as curious consumers turn to DNA to unravel their histories. The AncestryDNA kit Chris Linton So it’s not just me caught up in this craze — search for “Ancestry DNA results” on YouTube and you’ll find an entire subculture propped up by enthusiastic explorers probing their genetic histories. There’s a whole genre of evening TV dedicated to analyzing the family histories of the rich and famous. Over the last two years many DNA kit manufacturers have begun marketing their products as “perfect gifts.” In the 2018 Thanksgiving period, AncestryDNA broke its November sales record. Your DNA story has become this year’s hottest Christmas gift! Consumer genealogy tests have become big business practically overnight. Why are we so interested in finding out the secrets of our DNA?”I think the major appeal of DNA testing is to find out something new about us,” says Caitlin Curtis, a population geneticist at the University of Queensland. That’s certainly true for me, at least. My first thought is what revelations my spit might teach me about myself. But in the quest for answers, do we truly understand what kind of information we’re giving up?Related: The best DNA testing kits for 2019 Digging into your DNAThe almost unfathomable complexity of all life on Earth, from bacteria to humans, relies on DNA, but the DNA code itself is made up of just four letters: A, T, C and G.These letters, known as bases, always pair together the same way — A with T, C with G. The order in which these letters are arranged is what makes us different and gives us our unique traits. And because we hand parts of our DNA from parent to offspring, it also links us to the past. We just need to be able to “read” it and put all those bases in order. This is known as DNA sequencing. In the future, not even your DNA will be sacred Genealogy site credited with helping ID Golden State Killer suspect Best DNA Ancestry Testing Kits Now playing: Watch this: The genealogy craze 8 7:06 DNA data storage could solve a big problem Comments Who does that data belong to? It can be confusing, especially when these companies make deals with huge corporations to share their data.”I believe that there is an ethical obligation for these companies to be very upfront, honest and explain in simple terms to people what might happen to their data after they take a test, but that is not always the case,” says Curtis.AncestryDNA’s terms and conditions state that it “does not claim any ownership rights in the DNA submitted for testing” but by submitting a sample you effectively “grant AncestryDNA … a royalty-free, worldwide, sublicensable, transferable license to host, transfer, process, analyze, distribute, and communicate your Genetic Information for the purposes of providing you products and services.”It may be my DNA, but how it’s used in the future is something that AncestryDNA decides. However, there is a failsafe. The nuke-it-all option.”It’s your data, you should be able to do with it what you want,” Starr says. “If you decide at some point that you don’t want us to have it anymore, you can tell us to delete it and you can even tell us to destroy the DNA sample.”DNA as data”The biggest danger with handing control of your DNA data is the potential for discrimination based on that information,” says Curtis.Now that even our DNA is being digitized and stored in the infinite online filing cabinet of the World Wide Web, we must confront a reality in which our own genetic makeup can be hacked, stolen or used against us.”There are some parallels to broader conversations around how to govern our personal digital data online – and the possibility for it to be used in unanticipated ways in the future,” she continues.When we began signing up, en masse, for social media services such as Facebook and Twitter over a decade ago, we blindly shared our best baby photos and snarkiest thoughts with reckless abandon. Little did we know our personal data was being siphoned off insidiously and then used to target us in ad campaigns. And that data is still being generated and used today — Facebook gets to know exactly who we are in a matter of months. A cautionary tale, it would seem, considering genealogy testing has undergone rapid growth in the last two years. And though the science is getting better, the regulations and potential pitfalls are becoming harder to nail down.”It’s a complicated issue because in some countries there is protection against discrimination, and in some countries there are very few laws about what you can do with genetic data,” explains Curtis. In the US, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 prevents health insurers and employers from discriminating against you based on your genetic profile. However, in Australia, insurance companies can discriminate based on the results of a DNA test, increasing premiums or completely excluding coverage for certain diseases.Cool. Cool cool cool. Almost none of this research was done before I spat into a tube six or seven weeks ago, and now I realize my nerves weren’t about how much spittle I could produce. I jangled because I was diving headfirst into a world I thought I understood, but actually knew hardly anything about. There were voices gnawing at my subconscious. A devil on one shoulder, an angel on the other. One quietly trying to tell me that it’s kind of weird to give a private, multinational company access to the immutable information that can be used to identify me — and only me. The other saying “what can you lose?”You already know which one I listened to. I click through ready to solve this admittedly feeble personal mystery. But there are no shocking revelations. I end up with an ethnicity estimate that puts my DNA origins at 55 percent England, Wales and Northwestern Europe and 44 percent Ireland and Scotland.However, there’s also a zero to 1 percent chance my DNA comes from a region in West Africa that AncestryDNA pegs as relating to “Benin/Togo.” Surprising to me, but not unusual, according to Starr.”A 0-1 percent would say there might be something interesting here, but there might not,” he says. A result such as this might “fall out” in the future, as AncestryDNA’s databases continue to be refined by additional samples and research programs. My ethnicity estimate is only one half of the picture, however, because I can also look at my DNA matches, which directly correlates my DNA with that of other users in Ancestry’s database. In my case, it throws up two matches that AncestryDNA classes as “second cousins” — pretty close relatives of mine, according to my genes.I’ve never seen these people.And this is a caveat for the AncestryDNA kit. Your DNA might kick up matches with people you’ve never seen before, but if you want to fit them into your family tree, you need to subscribe to the other side of the Ancestry business to pore over how you might, potentially, be related to one another.  dnastoryMy ethnicity estimate had me at a 0 to 1 percent chance of having genetic heritage in Benin/Togo Jackson Ryan Digital DNA trailIn January, Buzzfeed News reported that FamilyTreeDNA, another huge provider of at-home DNA kits, had given the FBI access to its database of over a million profiles. The company provides the FBI with the ability to upload genetic profiles from crime scenes to FamilyTree’s database, which may aid them in genetically hunting down criminals. However, FamilyTree didn’t notify users that their genetic information might be used this way before giving the FBI access. And while there have been high-profile, beneficial uses for law enforcement — the apprehension in 2018 of a suspect in the Golden State Killer case, for example — it does raise issues about how this highly personal information may be shared in the future. Particularly concerning is the idea that you don’t even have to share your own DNA data for it to become searchable because your third cousin has already uploaded their own profile. It’s your data, you should be able to do with it what you want. Barry Starr The technology to perform this task has improved dramatically over the last two decades, driving the costs of DNA sequencing down from $10,000 in 2011 to $1,000 in 2017, according to the US National Human Genome Research Institute. Those advances have trickled through to the commercial sector, allowing a myriad of companies, from startups to huge public organizations, to develop their own at-home DNA testing kits.Kits provide customers with an estimation of their genetic histories, ancestries and even potential health issues they might run into. But going from a saliva sample to a genetic history solution is a complex process involving overwhelming amounts of data and statistical analyses that often confound more than they clarify. “There is a general lack of knowledge about how the whole process of ancestry testing works,” Curtis says. “People’s perceptions of the results might be different from the way a genetic scientist might interpret the results.”I’m pretty well versed in the complexities of molecular biology, but after sending my spittle away I become acutely aware that I have no idea how AncestryDNA’s test works. I know it’ll give me an “ethnicity estimate” and tell me my “DNA story,” but beyond the marketing buzzwords I’m in the dark.Science, math and dataAncestryDNA uses a database that contains more than 16,000 reference DNA samples from 43 regions around the world. About 12,000 of these samples come from Ancestry users who opt in and allow the company to use their DNA for research purposes, while the remaining reference samples come from public databases such as the 1000 Genomes Project.”We find people with long family histories from a certain part of the world and we analyze their DNA, and their DNA becomes, by definition, 100 percent from the region” says Barry Starr, director of scientific communications at AncestryDNA. The science of it is complex: The procedure splits up a DNA sample into 1,001 different “windows,” as Starr calls them. All up, those 1,001 windows look at approximately 700,000 spots in the DNA code. When you take the test, every window is compared to the 1,001 windows in a reference sample, and that occurs for each of AncestryDNA’s 43 regions.If 500 of those windows match, say, a Canadian region, then by AncestryDNA’s definition, I am 50 percent Canadian. Sci-Tech “It really is cutting-edge science, and as the field advances we advance with it and so provide updates to consumers when we have made changes based on the progression of the science,” says Starr.CNET rates AncestryDNA as having one of the best kits available, in large part thanks to its huge database. But testing doesn’t just rely on database size — where the data comes from is also important. Almost 75 percent of AncestryDNA’s ethnic regions skew toward European descent, so detailed estimates of ethnicity from other regions is difficult to obtain at present. A study, published in Nature in 2016, suggested that the scientific inquiry into genomes was also suffering from bias.With fewer reference samples from both consumers and scientific research available in regions of Africa and Asia, accurate estimates for genetic heritage in those locations are more prone to error. “Everyone started out in Africa, and a small set of them moved out of Africa and colonized the world,” explains Starr. “The genetic diversity within Africa is huge compared to the rest of the world, which means you need larger reference panels.”And the results of different genealogy tests may show marked differences. For instance, 23AndMe, a rival genealogy company based in California, has a more extensive catalogue of East Asian regions than AncestryDNA. Providing DNA samples to both companies could lead to completely different ethnicity estimates. It’s not that your DNA has changed — but the different databases and algorithms used to calculate it have. ancestrydnakit-3crop Ian Knighton/CNET My DNA storyI’m not exactly sure where I come from.An educated guess would say this impressively pale skin hails from a region localized entirely within Britain. There could be some Scottish in there. Maybe a hint of Irish, too. I don’t think there’s lots of room for suspense or intrigue here.Four weeks after I spat in a tube, my email chimes. Your AncestryDNA results are in!last_img read more

Sri Lankan militants plan another wave of attacks in military fatigues

first_imgSecurity forces patrol outside St. Anthony’s Church, one of the targets in a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Sunday, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on April 27, 2019.Xinhua/A. Hapuarachchi/IANSIn the wake of the Easter Sunday bombings, the security officials of Sri Lanka has warned that Islamic State-inspired terrorists are planning for more attacks wearing military fatigues in the island nation.In a letter to the defence and security sections of the island nation, the head of ministerial security division (MSD) has alerted of another ‘wave of attacks’. The MSD has warned that the IS militants may strike again by using a van.Sri Lankan intelligence agencies have also received potential intel that extremist group National Towheeth Jama’ath (NTJ) has also planned on attacking Buddhist temples in the country by using female bombers.The intelligence officers, after conducting a raid on Friday, found pairs of white blouse and skirts from a safe house at Sainthamaradu, nearly 364 km from Colombo. In March, 29 Muslim women had spent 29,000 SL rupees to purchase nine sets of such clothing from a textile shop in Giriulla, the officers said, reports IANS. Sri Lanka church explosiontwitterAccording to reports, the militants are planning to conduct acts of terror at five locations in Sri Lanka on Sunday or Monday including Batticaloa, other targets were not mentioned. But since there were no attacks on Sunday, the nation is on high alert and the security has been beefed up to prevent any further horrendous incidents.Even though ISIS had claimed the April 21 blasts, Sri Lankan officials suspect two groups behind the attacks – National Towheeth Jama’ath (NTJ) and Jammiyathul Millathu Ibrahim (JMI). Both the extremist groups have been banned by President Maithripala Sirisena.The Sri Lankan government had lifted the curfew imposed in the country on Sunday for the first time since the ghastly attacks, but search operations are being held nationwide and people linked with extremist and radical religious ideologies are being detained by the officials. Close Sri Lanka Attacks: What We Know So Far  (with agency inputs) IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:02/3:08Loaded: 0%0:02Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-3:06?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …last_img read more

Tata Motors subsidiary Jaguar Land Rover to hire 5000 staff in Britain

first_imgPhoto taken on July 6, 2016 shows the displayed Jaguar XE car at the 7th International Auto Exhibition 2016 in Xi’an, capital of northwest China’s Shaanxi Province.IANSBritain’s biggest carmaker Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) will hire 5,000 staff as it boosts its skills in autonomous and electric technology, a welcome business endorsement as Prime Minister Theresa May starts Brexit talks after a botched election.JLR, which employs more than 40,000 people globally, said it would hire 1,000 electronic and software engineers as well as 4,000 additional personnel including in manufacturing, most of whom will be based in Britain.The recruitment process will take place over the next 12 months, during Britain’s talks to leave the European Union, which carmakers have warned must result in a deal which retains free and unfettered trade to protect jobs.May lost her parliamentary majority in the June 8 general election that her Conservatives fought on the promise of a clean break with the EU single market and customs union.The renewed political uncertainty has seen business confidence tumble in recent days, according to surveys and business groups.Hours before the talks were due to begin in Brussels, the heads of the UK’s biggest business lobbies called on the government to engage “continuously” with UK business interests and strike a deal that preserves the benefits of EU membership including tariff-free trade, guarantees for EU citizens living in the UK and minimal customs formalities.Finance minister Philip Hammond said leaving the EU without an agreement would be a “very, very bad outcome for Britain” and he wanted an exit that would support employment and investment.”When I talk about a Brexit that supports British jobs, British investment and British business I mean a Brexit that avoids those cliff edges,” Hammond said in an interview with BBC television on Sunday.JLR, which is owned by India’s Tata Motors, will build its first electric vehicle, the I-PACE, in Austria but has said it wants to build such models in Britain if conditions such as support from government and academia are met.Automakers are racing to produce greener cars and improve charge times in a bid to meet rising customer demand and fulfil air quality targets but Britain lacks sufficient manufacturing capacity, an area ministers have said they want to build up.JLR, which builds just under a third of Britain’s 1.7 million cars, has said half of all its new models will be available in an electric version by the end of the decade, requiring new skills among its staff.last_img read more

Rice prices stable Tofail

first_imgTofail AhmedCommerce minister Tofail Ahmed on Sunday told parliament that the prices of rice and other daily essentials remain stable in the country.Responding to a question from Awami League MP SM Mostafa Rashidi (Khulna-4), he said the government succeeded in tackling the syndicate of dishonest hoarders and middlemen who usually manipulate the prices of food items and goods to create unrest in the market.“In the absence of the syndicate, the prices of essentials are now stable. People can buy commodities at tolerable prices,” Tofail said.Describing various steps taken by the government to arrest the once skyrocketing price of rice, he said, “The price is now at a tolerable level.”The minister also said the government established the Bangladesh Competition Commission to ensure so that no syndicate can be formed.He said the government will impose duty on the import of rice again after the harvest of new paddy.“Or else, the import of rice will go on and farmers won’t get fair prices for their produce,” he said.last_img read more

Formal trial in Holey Artisan attack case begins

first_imgThe formal trial in the Holey Artisan cafe attack case began on Monday with the deposition of a prosecution witness before a tribunal in Dhaka.Dhaka anti-terrorism special tribunal judge Mohammad Mujibur Rahman partially recorded the testimony of Ripon Kumar Das and adjourned the recording of deposition for Tuesday.After framing charges against eight ‘militants’ in the case, the tribunal on 26 November fixed 3 December for recording the statements of witnesses in the case.Of the eight accused, six are now in jail while two others have been on the run.The six accused are Jahangir Alam alias Rajib Gandhi, Mahmudul Hasan Mijan, Sohel Mahfuz, Rashidul Islam alias Ryash, Boro Mijan and Hadisur Rahman Sagor.The two absconding accused are Mamunur Rashid Ripon and Shariful Islam Khaled.On 23 July, the police pressed charges against eight alleged militants in the Holey Artisan cafe attack case.Hasnat Karim, a North South University teacher who was one of the hostages and later detained, was acquitted of the charges since there was no evidence of his complicity with the attack, according to the police.The terrorist attack that shattered the country and drew global attention, claimed lives of 22 people — nine Italians, seven Japanese, one Indian, one Bangladeshi-born American and two Bangladeshis along with two police officers — on 1 July 2016.A total 21 people were identified to be behind the attack. Among them, 13 were killed in gunfights at different times.last_img read more

African Americans Named to Head Three Morehouse Medical School Departments

first_imgThe Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in Atlanta.The Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in Atlanta recently appointed three African American faculty members to department chairs related to their field of study, effective July 1.Dr. Janice Herbert-Carter, an associate professor at the school, was appointed chairperson of the department of medical education at MSM. In her new role, she is charged with working to advance the department’s academic courses as well as expanding interdisciplinary education in the M.D. program by collaborating with other MSM educational initiatives.According to a MSM press release, Herbert-Carter will continue her roles as the associate professor of medical education and also an associate professor of family medicine.  She is a graduate of Princeton University in biochemistry and Afro-American Studies. Herbert-Carter earned her medical degree from Howard University College of medicine, where she also completed her internship and residency in internal medicine.Dr. Winston E. Thompson was named chairperson of MSM’s department of physiology. In his role, according to the press release, he will be the spokesperson for the department faculty, staff, and students.  Thompson received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Lafayette College in Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in cell and developmental biology from Rutgers University.The Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in AtlantaDr. Yasmin Tyler-Hill will serve as chairperson of the department of pediatrics. Tyler-Hill is responsible for advocating MSM’s mission to increase the number of primary pediatricians in Georgia through expansion of the community residency program. She is also charged with collaborating and seeking partners to build the department of developmental and behavioral pediatrics and enhance programs in community and general pediatrics, adolescent medicine, and the care and transition of care of children with hemoglobinopathies.Tyler-Hill graduated from Princeton University with a degree in biology. She went on to receive her medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina and completed her internship and residency at Boston City Hospital, now Boston University Medical Center.She joined MSM faculty as the assistant professor of clinical pediatrics in 2001 and later stepped into the associate professor position in 2009.last_img read more

Need to utilise solar power make the most of it

first_imgDelhi Lieutenant-Governor Najeeb Jung on Friday said that we are blessed with abundant sunlight in this part of the world and solar energy is the cleanest and cheapest source of energy and one should make the most of it. Jung was speaking during the inauguration of an awareness programme on renewable energy with special emphasis on solar energy at Delhi Secretariat which was organised by the Department of Power, Delhi and Solar energy corporation of India jointly.The L-G stressed upon the need for popularising the installation and use of solar energy. He said that the growing consumption of energy has resulted in increased dependence on fossil fuels, coal, oil and gas, which are all finite resources and are available in limited quantities. He said if small initiatives are taken at the grassroot level, the solar mission can become a success.last_img read more

Rep Whiteford approves bills giving families and seniors tax relief

first_img Categories: News,Whiteford News State Rep. Mary Whiteford of Casco Township today approved legislation giving Michigan families and seniors broader income tax relief.The legislation continues and increases personal exemptions for Michigan taxpayers and their dependents on their state income taxes. Other bills in the package provide additional tax relief for senior citizens.“The recent federal tax overhaul inadvertently created an increase in state taxes for Michiganders,” Whiteford said. “This legislation ensures that our state taxes will not be affected and even gives more tax relief to individuals and families.”One of the bills ensures Michigan taxpayers will be able to continue claiming personal exemptions on their income taxes after federal tax reforms signed into law last month. The bill increases the state personal exemption from the current $4,000 to $4,800 by the 2020 tax year.The legislation also provides a tax credit for those 62 and older — $100 for single filers and $200 for joint filers – in addition to the personal exemption increase. A third bill would allow taxpayers in Michigan cities with an income tax to continue to claim exemptions.The House specifically added a provision to make sure public school funding is not negatively affected by the proposal.House Bills 5420-22 advance to the Senate for consideration### 25Jan Rep. Whiteford approves bills giving families and seniors tax relieflast_img read more

On his first day in his new job BBC director gene

first_imgOn his first day in his new job, BBC director general Tony Hall has told staff that the corporation’s “best days lie ahead” and that he will set out how to shape its “next chapter” in the coming weeks.In an email to all staff, Hall said “later this year I will share my thinking with the Trust before outlining our new ambitions for the BBC,” as it moves towards its centenary in 2012. He added that he will spend the coming months listening to thoughts of the staff.He said that the questions the BBC needed to ask itself included how can it improve the quality and distinctiveness of its programmes, what are the next big trends in technology and how can the BBC act as a catalyst for creative and digital economies?“There are obviously other big questions and we must address them all whilst adapting to the ways in which Britain, its society, nations and regions are changing,” he said.Addressing the Jimmy Savile scandal that rocked the corporation last year, Hall said “we are now winning back trust,” but warned “we must never take it for granted.” He said that he was confident about the BBC’s future due to the calibre of its staff and the values they all share.last_img read more

DOCSIS channel shipments reached 12 million in th

first_imgDOCSIS channel shipments reached 1.2 million in the second quarter, marking the first time the figure exceed 1 million in a single quarter, according to Infonetics Research.The new study claims that the combined CCAP and CMTS upstream and downstream DOCSIS channel shipments in Q2 easily beat last quarter’s record, and that “the velocity of the shift from CMTS to CCAP remains phenomenal.”“Global CCAP revenue jumped another 42% sequentially in 2Q14, as cable operators continued to shift spending to CCAP platforms in an effort to take advantage of their higher densities and lower per-channel prices,” said Jeff Heynen, principal analyst for broadband access and pay TV at Infonetics Research.Combined revenue for CCAP, CMTS, edge QAM, and CMC equipment reached US$411 million worldwide in 2Q, up 24% from the previous quarter, with Arris, Cisco and Casa Systems the dominant players in the CCAP, CMTS, and CMC market.Infonetics said that in North America, where the shift to CCAP is “most acute”, CCAP revenue increased 39% in Q2 quarter-over-quarter.last_img read more