SETI vs. Intelligent Design

first_imgIntelligent Design proponents have often pointed to the similarity between what they are doing and what SETI is doing.  For example, SETI is attempting to detect evidence of intelligence in coded signals from space, and design biologists are detecting evidence of intelligence in the DNA code.  Seth Shostak, Director of the SETI Institute, decided to challenge that comparison in the weekly SETI report on Space.com.  He started with a comparison of his own: ID people are no more to be taken seriously than the comedian who found a potato that looked like Richard Nixon’s head.  But then he got serious; isn’t there a double standard, if SETI is accepted by the scientific community and ID is not?    First, Shostak argued that the signals SETI is searching for are not all that complex.  A code or message is not a requirement; a valid candidate might just be a “persistent narrowband whistle” of no known natural origin.  Still, why would SETI be able to deduce intelligence with far less complexity than the high complexity found in DNA?  Here, Shostak made a surprising statement: such a simple, narrow signal from space would constitute better evidence for intelligence than the DNA code:Well, it’s because the credibility of the evidence is not predicated on its complexity.  If SETI were to announce that we’re not alone because it had detected a signal, it would be on the basis of artificiality.  An endless, sinusoidal signal – a dead simple tone – is not complex; it’s artificial.  Such a tone just doesn’t seem to be generated by natural astrophysical processes.  In addition, and unlike other radio emissions produced by the cosmos, such a signal is devoid of the appendages and inefficiencies nature always seems to add – for example, DNA’s junk and redundancy. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)He admitted that the pulsar first thought to be evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence in 1967 did not convey information, but then says that it was profligate in its signal, broadcasting all over the spectrum.  This, he claims, shows that it was a signal no alien would produce; it would be too “wasteful.”  In cells and sea lions, on the other hand, nature produces things full of “Junk, redundancy and inefficiency” he claimed.  To him, this proves they were not artificially engineered because they are not “optimally built.”    A second error in the comparison, Shostak continued, is in overlooking the importance of context.  SETI researchers would be justified in inferring artificiality if they found a large green square on an earth-like planet (instead of in a group of stars), just like archaeologists are justified in inferring hominid tool-making if rock chips are found in a cave.    In summary, Shostak disavows the comparison between SETI and ID research on two counts: (1) SETI is not looking for messages with evidence of intelligence, but only for simple artificial signals; (2) SETI is looking for artificiality in the context of places where such “very modest complexity” would be unexpected and not otherwise observed.  The last word: “This is clearly nothing like looking at DNA’s chemical makeup and deducing the work of a supernatural biochemist.”We have to hand it to Seth Shostak for tackling an argument head-on without too much mocking.  Will his arguments stand up to scrutiny?  You decide.  In the first place, looking for a simple signal is just the first pass filter.  All the SETI literature has been replete with claims that eventually humans want to converse with the aliens and learn from them.  Jimmy Carter spoke for the earth in writing, “We hope some day, having solved the problems we face, to join a community of galactic civilizations.”  That’s also why our messages to them have been very complex: from the Arecibo message, to the Pioneer plaque, and especially to the Voyager records – loaded with information, telling them as much about ourselves as the bandwidth allowed.  Finding a “persistent narrowband whistle” would most certainly instigate an intensive follow-up search to first confirm the artificiality of the signal, and then try to discover more complexity in it.  Shostak and the world would certainly not be sufficiently convinced to get off at the whistle-stop and say, “well, we found intelligent life, so let’s move on to something else.”  Look at how the alleged canals on Mars sent scientists and the public into a frenzy to get more data and learn more about a possible Martian civilization.  The confirmation of extraterrestrial intelligence would surely demand more complexity in the signal, just as it did in the SETI-dominated movie Contact.    As to Shostak’s second argument that an artificial signal would be efficient whereas life is profligate and wasteful, who is he kidding?  This is a red herring wrapped in circular reasoning.  Like most of the SETI crowd, Shostak is an evolutionist.  He assumes life evolved, and he assumes evolution is a wasteful process without design, so when he finds what (to him) looks like wastefulness and redundancy, he only argues his assumptions.  This is the old dysteleology (bad design) argument, but it is rather presumptuous to tell the Designer “if you were really so smart, you would have done it my way.”  In the first place, Shostak obviously has not been listening to the molecular biologists who are in such awe of the efficiency and robustness of biological machinery that they are racing to imitate it (11/19/2005).  (Artists may try to imitate junk, but not engineers.)  In the second place, the “junk DNA” he speaks of is rapidly being redefined as more about its essential functions is being uncovered (10/20/2005, 09/08/2005, 07/15/2005).  In the third place, he presumes he knows what the aliens would do, when maybe, to them, sending a wideband message might make more sense than a narrowband one.  In the fourth place, he assumes human intelligence is not profligate, redundant and wasteful.  Ever seen government regulations?  So not only is he presumptuous and uninformed over the particular claims of this argument, it is an irrelevant argument anyway: SETI would certainly follow up any sign of “artificiality” with a massive search for more complexity containing a message.  He argued that the ID claim that “complexity would imply intelligence, is also wrong.”  But this misrepresents the claims of ID (see next paragraph), and will come back to bite his own assertion in the end.    Shostak also misleads his readers by making a false distinction between artificiality and complexity.  This equivocation also begs the question about design vs. evolution.  The ID literature has made it clear that it is not just complexity that makes a design inference valid, but specified complexity.  If an “artificial” signal were found with enough complexity beyond what could be produced naturally, it would be specified by definition, even if it were a persistent lowband whistle.  After ruling out chance and natural law as sources, both Shostak and the ID community would conclude that an intelligent design inference is warranted.  So the distinction disappears.  Both sides also agree that specified complexity depends on context; a little complexity, like a cairn on a trail, is sufficient to make a design inference in the mountains, whereas much more specified complexity would be required to declare a forger guilty.    And what is “artificial” anyway, if not designed by an intelligence?  Shostak is not being consistent here, because to him, artificiality evolved: it has its roots in non-design.  How could artificiality (i.e., purposeful action of a designer) evolve in the first place?  At what point did purpose and intent (i.e., free will) diverge from chance and necessity?  A beaver is intelligent, but is hauling a piece of wood for the purpose of making a dam equivalent to sending an intelligent signal bearing information?  Is the guard crow sending intelligent communication when it caws the warning signal to the flock?  Suppose an alien planet had frogs that croaked with a persistent narrowband whistle in the radio range; would SETI be ready to ask them about the meaning of life and how to survive global war?  Clearly a different category of communication is being sought here.  SETI goes beyond astrobiology.  It would not be content to find bacteria on Mars; it wants evidence of purpose, intent, intelligence and free will – beings capable of harnessing nature to send information-bearing messages that would never occur by chance or natural law.  Humans do this all the time: smoke signals, skywriting, petroglyphs, writing with a stick in the sand, or beaming bits into space.  How can Shostak make a design inference based on artificiality (extraterrestrial intelligence, the kind that intends to communicate with us) without first assuming the very criterion he wants to deny to advocates of intelligent design?  And without coming up with some sort of criterion for minimum specified complexity, how can he distance himself from the comedian who finds a potato that looks like Richard Nixon’s head?    Finally, let’s have a little fun at Seth Shostak’s expense, with all due respect.  One of the persistent harangues against intelligent design is that it “brings science to a halt by claiming a designer did it.”  According to this view, ID scientists are lazy and prone to jumping to conclusions.  They don’t want to be diligent in performing the rigorous work necessary to find natural explanations for complex phenomena (see 11/21/2005 end of main article).  This is not true, because using the Dembski Explanatory Filter, intelligent causes are always a last resort after natural and chance causes are eliminated.  But let’s put the shoe on the other foot for a change.  Dr. Shostak, Jill Tarter et al.,wouldn’t it be the lazy way out for a SETI scientist to infer intelligence for a persistent narrowband whistle?  Surely a naturalistic explanation must be out there.  You must keep trying, ad infinitum, till a natural cause is found.  If you infer intelligence was the cause, you are just giving up.  You are failing to perform the rigorous analysis necessary to do science; you are bringing science to a halt.    Nice try, Dr. Shostak.  Think about this some more and try again.  And while you’re at it, tell us how your own intelligent message-sending capacity evolved, or how it can be distinguished from chance and natural law, if nature is all there is. (Visited 28 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Grasses Ratchet Their Seeds Into Distance Travelers

first_imgJohn Muir said we should not pity plants as prisoners to one spot.  In their own ways, they travel the world as we humans do.  Anyone who has walked through wild dry grass may have been annoyed at how many foxtails get buried in their socks and how hard it is to get them out.  The seeds were not engineered for socks, but for animal fur.  Once embedded, they become successful hitchhikers.  The shape of the seeds, along with tiny barbs pointing backwards, ensure that the seeds work their way deep into the fur.  The seed may find itself the pioneer of a new land far from where it was born.    Charles Wolgemuth [U of Connecticut) talked about this in Current Biology.1  Many plants do more than just cast their fates to the wind; “some grasses, at least, are not so cavalier and have engineered their seed carrying appendages (spikelets) to increase dispersion and facilitate seed burial by converting periodic or random oscillations in the environment into directed motion.”  Foxtails may look like dead, dry, inert things, but they can hitchhike, walk along the ground and even bury themselves into the soil.  On the ground, they can take advantage of diurnal cycles of moisture and temperature.  Their spikelets, called awns, expand and shrink, ratcheting the seed forward.  Some of them even have spiral tips that can drill the seeds into the ground.    Wolgemuth noted other instances where nature has used ratchet mechanisms to good advantage: snakes, whose skin moves their undulating motions in one direction, and jellyfish and bugs that can use water or air motions to achieve unidirectional travel.  Even inside the cell, molecular motors like myosin, the flagellum and ATP synthase (05/25/2009) ratchet up the random Brownian motion in their environment into linear or rotary motion.  His discussion of ratchets in nature led Wolgemuth to speculate about ratcheting as a general principle of biology.  Unfortunately, this won him Stupid Evolution Quote of the Week :Biology has thus repeatedly found ways of producing net work by rectifying fluctuations with ratchets, and it is interesting to speculate on other areas where this mechanism may play a role.  Evolution is one directly analogous system and a comparison between it and Brownian ratchets has been drawn previously.  Clearly, random mutations in an organism’s genome lead to fluctuations in phenotype.  Reproduction can lock in these variations, and natural selection then acts as a ratchet, reducing the likelihood of maintaining a population that is less competent at reproducing while increasing phenotypic populations that are fitter.  A more tenuous comparison, though, comes to mind when I consider my own thoughts, which all too often seem quite random.  I must consciously work to rectify these thoughts, plucking out the good ones and discarding the bad, in an attempt to construct an understanding of the world about me.  Could my own thinking be working by trapping useful ideas from a pool of noise?  One of the not-so-useful ideas, right?  But, it has been suggested that certain nuclei in the basal ganglia act as a random motor pattern noise generator.  If our brains can create noise, maybe they can ratchet it too.Wolgemuth did not make a distinction between purposeful choice in matters of truth and falsehood, and mindless mechanisms without purpose or goal.  He also did not distinguish between physical ratchet mechanisms and conceptual ones (argument from analogy), and ended up personifying biology as an engineer.  On fitness as a ratchet for progress, see 10/30/2002, “Fitness for Dummies.”Tip: To get foxtails out of your socks, don’t try to pull them out backwards.  Push them through the cloth in the direction their natural ratchet wants to go.1.  Charles Wolgemuth, “Plant Biomechanics: Using Shape to Steal Motion,” Current Biology, Volume 19, Issue 10, 26 May 2009, Pages R409-R410.One of the best videos of the motion of grass seeds is in volume one of Moody’s DVD set Wonders of God’s Creation.  Time-lapse photography shows the seeds moving around like bugs and even burying themselves in the soil.    It’s a shame Wolgemuth had to turn an otherwise interesting scientific discussion about plant engineering into another shallow Darwinian speculation.  If he is unable to separate his own thoughts from noise, why should his readers try to do so?Tip: To get Darwinian foxtails out of your brain, don’t try to pull them out backwards.  Push them through to their logical conclusions, where their blunt pointlessness becomes evident to all.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Stalking case hits Haryana BJP

first_imgRahul, Yechury demand action on Chandigarh stalking case  Opposition protestOpposition parties held protests across the State, seeking the resignation of Mr. Barala.Ashok Tanwar, president of the Congress State unit, who led a protest in Faridabad on Sunday, said an impartial and fair investigation was not possible with Mr. Barala leading the ruling BJP in the State.Mr. Tanwar demanded that he resign on “moral grounds”.He said the BJP had coined the slogan Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao, but the entire State machinery was involved in protecting the son of the ruling party leader.Lighter sectionsMr. Tanwar alleged that lighter sections of the Indian Penal Code were invoked in the first information report, and the accused was let off on bail, showing political interference in the investigation.Leader of the Opposition in the Haryana Assembly Abhay Chautala tweeted that the BJP should immediately remove its State president if the party had any self-respect left.Complainant’s standThe complainant told The Hindu over the phone that the Chandigarh police was helpful from the time she made a call to the police control room till she lodged a formal complaint.“The police literally saved my life. The police reached exactly when one of the boys tried to open the door of my car. I do not know what might have happened had the police not reached in time,” she said.She said that she told the police exactly what had happened and could not comment on the sections invoked by the police.“It is their internal matter,” the woman, a disc jockey, said. She did not know the boys prior to the incident.On social mediaHer father said in a Facebook post: “As a father of two daughters, I feel compelled to take this matter to its logical conclusion. The goons must be punished and the law must take its course … I feel if people with some privileges like us cannot stand up to such criminals, nobody in India can. More important, I will be failing in my duty as a father to my daughter if I did not stand with her completely in this matter.”Deputy Superintendent of Police Satish Kumar, who is the Sub-Divisional Police Officer of East Chandigarh, said the police were seeking legal opinion to ascertain if more relevant sections could be invoked in the case. A day after Vikas, son of Subhash Barala, president of the BJP’s Haryana State unit, was arrested, along with his friend Ashish, on the charge of stalking a woman, Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Sunday defended his party colleague.“This matter does not concern Subhash Barala, but pertains to an individual. So the action should be initiated against the individual concerned,” Mr. Khattar told presspersons in Hisar.He said he had full faith in the police and the judiciary, and hoped that the Chandigarh Police would carry out a proper investigation.In a press statement, Rajiv Jain, who heads the media department of the BJP in the State, said allegations of political pressure in the case were “baseless” and “without facts”.Also Readlast_img read more

Can This New Crop Of Players Erase Englands Underachieving Past

Tottenham HotspurPremier League7.60 4Uruguay0.832+1.17 UnderachieversExpectedActualDifference 5Mexico0.520-0.52 Southgate’s plan seems to be to put the players from these teams into a compatible lineup before re-creating their off-the-ball tactics. As I noted in my Group G preview, of all the teams to qualify for the World Cup, England ranks third in breaking up an opponent’s possession before it completes three passes, behind only Germany and Spain.England’s famed problem has been getting its generational talents to click together. For once, the big teams in the Premier League are kindred spirits tactically, and this will have an impact on the national team’s ability to leverage the players provided by those clubs.Young attackersEngland is fielding an extremely young side in Russia, with an average age of 26 — only Nigeria is younger. And England’s average of 19 caps per player makes it the most inexperienced side in the competition.2Tied with Tunisia. But while they may be relatively new to the international stage, these youngsters are by no means immature in terms of elite soccer. England’s attack, in particular, is filled to the brim with talent just ready to peak. England features cohorts from aggressive-pressing clubsThe 10 big five European club teams best at pressuring opponents, 2017-18 2Netherlands0.670-0.67 4Russia0.600-0.60 Cups won Cups won 2Germany2.044+1.96 1Hungary0.920-0.92 1Brazil3.015+1.99 5Argentina1.442+0.56 Manchester CityPremier League6.71 sec. Hamburger SVBundesliga8.22 Nonetheless, the team that will face Tunisia on Monday is new and exciting. Gone are the mainstays from the past three World Cups, players like Wayne Rooney, Steven Gerrard and Frank Lampard. Because of the players’ age and inexperience, this team is free of the weight of expectation — despite having the seventh best pre-tournament chance of taking the trophy home, according to FiveThirtyEight predictions. And for the neutral fan, too, England has a lot to offer.Tactical coherencePep Guardiola — the current manager of Manchester City, which became the first team in history to break the 100-point mark in the Premier League — has had an indirect hand in the past two World Cup-winning teams. In the final against the Netherlands in 2010, eight players featured on the pitch for Spain had been coached by Guardiola in his time at Barcelona. When Mario Götze broke Argentinian hearts in 2014, he was one of seven German players in the final to have played under the Catalan manager that season at Bayern Munich.This is likely to be less about Guardiola specifically, despite his brilliance, and more about his indirect influence on the tactical coherence of a national team. With him at the helm of the country’s best side, his players would naturally get national team starts; the ability of those players to click when on the pitch together meant that they had more coherent tactics than other teams stacked with good players. Indeed, Italy, which won the 2006 World Cup with a quintessentially Italian style of football, featured a spine of five Juventus players in the final.With only four Manchester City players on the squad, manager Gareth Southgate will pay homage to Guardiola’s team in style more than in personnel. Man City midfielders David Silva and Kevin De Bruyne are playing for Spain and Belgium respectively, but Southgate will try to replicate them by using Jesse Lingard and Dele Alli as “free eights” in the midfield. England has six more players total from Tottenham, managed by Mauricio Pochettino, and Liverpool, managed by Jürgen Klopp. These teams, like City, press the opposition extremely aggressively out of possession, with all three in the top 10 in Europe’s biggest competitions this season in terms of how quickly they shut down their opponents: Tottenham’s Harry Kane, for example, is one of the best goal-scoring strikers in the world at the tender age of 24. Somewhat terrifyingly, he is still improving: He was even better at getting off quality shots this season than he was the year before. The expected goals per 90 minutes from his shots in the Premier League rose from 0.45 in 2016-17 to 0.75 this year.Dele Alli, 22, will support Kane for their country as he does for their club. His 2017-18 season was marred for some by the idea that it was a regression compared with the year before. What really happened, though, was that he got fewer chances but created more. He also experienced a downturn in chance conversion, from scoring 44 percent more than might be expected based on chance quality in 2016-17 to underachieving it by 12 percent this season. All that made people forget that Alli is one of the brightest under-23 talents in the world. And nobody — apart from maybe Denmark’s Christian Eriksen — is better at supplying Kane.Man City’s Raheem Sterling may have made recent headlines for getting a rifle tattooed on his leg, but the more important of his designs is the one on his arm of a young boy, wearing England’s No. 10 shirt, looking up at Wembley Stadium, the home of English football. He’s my player to watch for Group G because of his electric ability to both get and create chances, coming off the back of an incredibly productive league season with 18 goals and 11 assists. And he’s only 23.Dark horses?The biggest problem for England in terms of being a dark horse in Russia is its likely post-group opposition. The English have a good shot of making the quarterfinal (58 percent when the tourney began) but will probably have to face Germany or Brazil at that point, depending on whether England finishes above Belgium in their group. Winning a matchup against one of those powerhouses is a long shot, though anything can happen in a World Cup.England has an exciting team of young stars, playing at stylistically compatible clubs, and a manager who seems tactically savvy despite his relative inexperience. Even if they don’t manage to bring home the trophy this summer, the future looks bright for The Three Lions for the first time in a generation.Neil Paine contributed research.Check out our latest World Cup predictions. OverachieversExpectedActualDifference Expected goals1388 Goals3528 Bayern MunichBundesliga7.51 England’s youth movementRanks of Dele Alli, Harry Kane and Raheem Sterling in key offensive statistics in the English Premier League, 2017-18 teamleagueAvg. Opponent Possession Duration *Among attackers with at least 850 minutes playedSource: Football Whispers Borussia DortmundBundesliga7.91 LiverpoolPremier League7.92 EibarLa Liga7.23 Rank per 90 minutes* The big five leagues are the Premier League (England), Bundesliga (Germany), Ligue 1 (France), La Liga (Spain) and Serie A (Italy).Source: Football Whispers Assists93158 Expected assists76127 3England1.621-0.62 There is an uncharacteristic air of hope this year surrounding an uncharacteristic England team. To be an England supporter is to inherit a contradictory combination of utter nihilism and raging anger, expecting nothing and everything at the same time. English players have developed an unfortunate reputation: They will wilt under the brightest lights, typified by the inability to hold their nerve during penalty shootouts.But the perception of mental weakness between generations is, to some extent, a consequence of the spread-out nature of international tournaments. The World Cup is rare and unpredictable: Germany, the defending champion, had just a 13 percent chance of winning in Russia going into the tournament, according to FiveThirtyEight’s model, and even Brazil, the favorite, had less than a 20 percent chance.Using pre-tournament Elo ratings going back to 1930, we can construct a logistic regression to look at how many World Cup trophies each country might have expected based on team strength, the competition format and whether the country was hosting.1Historically, having a home advantage makes a big difference, so the model adjusts for the advantage that comes with hosting responsibility.Brazil, Germany and Italy have roughly a pair of trophies each more than the model’s predictions based on their strength before the tournament, which illustrates that the World Cup is hardly a tale of who the favorite is going in.England has underachieved, winning a solitary trophy relative to 1.62 expected World Cups. By our measure, only Hungary, which was one of the world’s best in the 1950s, and the three-time runner-up Netherlands have seen a bigger discrepancy. English supporters born after 1966 are justified in feeling a tad underwhelmed by the team’s performances on the world stage, but it could be worse — of the underachievers, England is the only team to actually have managed a win at all. England should have more trophiesTop five under- and overachievers by actual World Cups won vs. expected Successful dribbles666831 MarseilleLigue 18.15 RomaSerie A8.36 3Italy2.144+1.86 Based on a logistic regression that uses each team’s pre-World Cup ELO rating, accounting for host country and size of field. Germany’s history includes West Germany, while Russia’s includes the Soviet Union.Source: EloRATINGS.NET RB LeipzigBundesliga7.88 StatisticHarry KaneDele AlliRaheem Sterling read more

How ParentingWeekly Drove Online CPMs Over 30

first_imgAd networks are an easy way for publishers to generate ancillary revenue online, but the ubiquity of those same ad networks is also driving down the price of online advertising. Geo- and demographic-targeting is all the rage, but forcing ads on readers who haven’t requested them can alienate an audience quickly.ParentingWeekly, a registration-based online destination for expecting parents with an audience of more than 1.9 million, has teamed with Pontiflex, an e-mail and social acquisition platform, to leverage its sign-up advertising technology.Users are able to sign up directly within the ad, while staying on the ParentingWeekly site. The Pontiflex-enabled ads appear on the registration “thank you” pages, sweepstakes sections and on the “Steals and Deals” page. Users can receive additional information on the products.“When someone registers on ParentingWeekly, we provide a panel of different offers and the technology collects the data and sends it to the advertiser,” says Zephrin Lasker, co-founder and CEO of Pontiflex. The publisher side requires placing a piece of Javascript. “I’m no Web engineer but I could place the code in the page and get it up and running,” says ParentingWeekly program manager Marlyss Bird. “It’s transparent, we’re not sneaking subscriber names in.”Participating Pontiflex advertisers include brands such as Kimblerly-Clark. Pontiflex operates on a cost-per-lead model. While it won’t reveal the range, Pontiflex pays the publisher for the lead, takes a markup on that, and then passes it along to the advertiser.CPMs have since rise to $31 on ParentingWeekly. “This is not displacing any existing placement, we’re treating this as ‘found money,’” says Bird.last_img read more

Runners World Sees Boom In Social Media

first_imgWhile the industry sits back and reconsiders its newsstand strategy in the face of Tuesday’s bleak Fas-Fax report, Rodale’s fitness title, Runner’s World, is looking at its social engagement platforms and enjoying success.In one year, the magazine was able to increase its Facebook following by 111 percent, up to 309,070 likes as of February 8, an increase of 163,000 from January 2011 and an increase of 15,070 from since the first of this year. Similarly, the publication’s Twitter followers also saw steep increases—in one year the title increased its following on the platform by 293 percent, from 54,000 to 212,000. Furthermore, the magazine’s Twitter platform increased by 18.4 percent from 179,000 to its current number since the first of this year. “In January, we covered the U.S. Olympic Marathon trials, which selects the runners who will compete in the Olympics,” she says. “This year, NBC owned the rights and they decided to broadcast it the afternoon of the race so there was no live broadcast available. We really crept into an area where people needed coverage—we were able to live blog it, live tweet it and updated Facebook with posts midway through the race and at the end. People could follow the race live when they couldn’t do it any other way.”Leveraging itself within the running niche to create exclusive content opportunities is one way the publication has increased its value proposition to users, prompting them follow the brand. In addition to filling gaps in coverage, the magazine rolled out special social media initiatives, which also contributed to its growth.Loftus and a running pal formulated a plan to run every day from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day—a time of year that presents the hardest challenge to staying in shape, she says. The editor brought the idea to the staff of Runner’s World, which implemented it on social media—creating the hash tag RWRunStreak.“A lot of our audience struggles in the same way that we do in staying fit through the holidays since marathon season ends with the fall and training for spring races doesn’t start until January or February, it creates a gap that a lot of people have trouble with,” she says. “We were able to get into that space and create this initiative that people really got into. I believe the final number on that hash tag in that 40 day period between Thanksgiving and New Years generated about 7,000 unique tweets, which is pretty significant. Some people have decided to keep the streak going so the hash tag is still in rotation.”In all, the RWRunStreak hash tag generated a total of 10 million impressions—the maximum number of people that could have seen it through other people’s Twitter accounts. In the 43 days the campaign was active, the title added 34,000 new followers, a 22 percent increase.The brand’s editorial also supports its social media efforts—its most popular hash tag is RunningTips, which is supported by service driven content with original web copy or pieces from back issues. About three to five times a day the group posts original articles that include running related data, tips for motivation and racing news, which are also shared on social media sites to heighten engagement.“What helps us is we know our audience runs,” says Loftus. “They want to hear about what runners are doing so we can use these platforms to put them in touch with that and with us.” “We’ve had a few separate initiatives that have created really big boosts,” says Meghan Loftus, associate multimedia editor for the title. “For national marathons, we have a large presence on Facebook and Twitter. For those kinds of things we live Tweet the races and we point people to our website which has live blogs.”The magazine creates specific hash tags to cover live running related news from events like the New York City or Boston Marathons or other large sporting events.last_img read more

One Take Pronoun Gets Possessive On Pizza NSync Tamagotchis More

first_imgIn this episode, Vellturo spilled the beans on her favorite live concert of all time, the best place to score pizza in New York City, why the color pink and Tamagotchis rock, her first favorite band (hint: it’s a ’90s boy band), guilty song pleasure (another hint: “maybe” you know it), and more.You can catch Vellturo on tour in North America now through June. And if you get the chance for some face time, how about bringing her a Tamagotchi or a Justin Timberlake action figure? Watch One Take With Pronoun Aka Alyse Vellturo one-take-pronoun-gets-possessive-pizza-nsync-tamagotchis-more Watch One Take With Little Big Town One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry Watch One Take With Superfruit Email Watch: One Take With Khalid Watch: One Take With Khalid News Watch One Take With Logic One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley Watch: One Take With Lights Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark Watch One Take With Halestorm Watch One Take With Nick Cannon Watch One Take With Julia Michaels One Take With The Mrs Watch: One Take With MØ One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat Watch One Take With Marian Hill Watch: One Take With MØ Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves Watch: One Take With Brandy Clark Watch: One Take With Pronoun Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton One Take With Superstar DJ Tiësto Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs” One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan One Take One Take With The Mrs Watch One Take With Superfruit Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan Watch One Take With Anthony Hamilton Watch One Take With Julia Michaels One Take With Indie Pop-Duo Freedom Fry Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take One Take With Producer Greg Wells One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch One Take With Nick Cannon One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves Watch One Take With Julia Michaels Watch: One Take With Lights Watch: One Take With MØ One Take With Producer Greg Wells One Take With Le Butcherettes Prev Nextcenter_img Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal One Take With The Mrs One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch: One Take With Gramps Morgan One Take With Amber Rubarth Watch: One Take With Pronoun Watch: One Take With Dorothy Watch One Take With Marian Hill One Take With Demo Taped Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal One Take With Singer/Songwriter Kacey Musgraves Watch: One Take With Lights Watch One Take With Little Big Town One Take: Pronoun Gets Possessive On Pizza, *NSync, Tamagotchis & More Watch One Take With Logic Watch: One Take With Khalid Watch One Take With Afrojack One Take With Demo Taped Watch: One Take With Dorothy Watch One Take With Superfruit One Take With Reggae Artist Ziggy Marley One Take With Demo Taped One Take With Producer Greg Wells Watch One Take With Halestorm Watch One Take With Marian Hill Facebook One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With Australian Singer/Rapper Mallrat NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO May 2, 2018 – 2:15 pm Watch: One Take With Pronoun One Take With Superstar DJ Tiësto Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take Watch: One Take With Pronoun One Take With Amber Rubarth Watch One Take With Nick Cannon Watch One Take With Afrojack One Take With Amber Rubarth Watch: One Take With Dorothy One Take With Pop Trio Ocean Park Standoff One Take With Le Butcherettes The Brooklyn-based singer/songwriter dishes on the best slice of pizza in NYC, her favorite thing to come out of the ’90s, her guilty pleasure, and … you’ll have to watch to find out what elseTim McPhateGRAMMYs May 2, 2018 – 2:27 pm Last we heard, Brooklyn-based singer/songwriter Pronoun — aka Alyse Vellturo — was prepping to release her first full-length LP for 2018, which promises to continue the genuine songcraft she hinted at on her 2016 EP, There’s No One New Around You. In the meantime, we caught up with Vellturo for a go at One Take, GRAMMY.com’s rapid-fire question game that challenges your favorite artists to answer as many questions about life, music and everything else in just one minute. One Take With Grupo Fantasma Watch One Take With Halestorm Watch: One Take With Deva Mahal Watch G-Eazy Take On One Take Watch One Take With Afrojack Watch One Take With Little Big Town One Take With Le Butcherettes Watch One Take With Logic Twitter One Take With Superstar DJ Tiëstolast_img read more

NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Full-Time Class D Delivery Driver at J. Polep Distribution ServicesFull-Time Production Technician at CutisPharmaPart-Time Medical Assistant at AllOne HealthFull-Time Credit Analyst at Standard ElectricFull-Time Human Resources Manager at Northland Industrial Truck CompanyFull-Time Line Cook at Red Heat TavernFull-Time Drivers & Movers at Two Men And A TruckFull-Time/Part-Time Cooks & Servers at 99 RestaurantPart-Time Afternoon Route Delivery Driver at OptimaPart-Time Cargo Van Delivery Driver at Optima(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of July 14, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

Rice prices stable Tofail

first_imgTofail AhmedCommerce minister Tofail Ahmed on Sunday told parliament that the prices of rice and other daily essentials remain stable in the country.Responding to a question from Awami League MP SM Mostafa Rashidi (Khulna-4), he said the government succeeded in tackling the syndicate of dishonest hoarders and middlemen who usually manipulate the prices of food items and goods to create unrest in the market.“In the absence of the syndicate, the prices of essentials are now stable. People can buy commodities at tolerable prices,” Tofail said.Describing various steps taken by the government to arrest the once skyrocketing price of rice, he said, “The price is now at a tolerable level.”The minister also said the government established the Bangladesh Competition Commission to ensure so that no syndicate can be formed.He said the government will impose duty on the import of rice again after the harvest of new paddy.“Or else, the import of rice will go on and farmers won’t get fair prices for their produce,” he said.last_img read more

Misconduct Allegations Continue to Dog BPD

first_imgBy Sean Yoes, AFRO Baltimore Editor, syoes@afro.comMore allegations of police misconduct are being aimed again at the beleaguered Baltimore Police Department (BPD). The latest charges are being leveled by Baltimore’s Civilian Review Board (CRB) in reference to the case of Keith Davis, Jr.This week, the CRB said Davis was wrongfully charged after being shot by police officers. He is currently in jail on handgun charges and is facing a murder charge connected to the June 2015 shooting death of Kevin Jones, a security guard at Pimlico Race Course in Northwest Baltimore. Davis was shot hours later by Baltimore police after allegedly running from the scene of a car crash, according to the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s Office.The Baltimore Civilian Review Board says the Baltimore Police Department, headed by Commissioner Darryl Desousa (standing behind Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh), wrongfully charged Keith Davis. (Courtesy photo)However, the CRB, after studying the Davis case for nearly two years, concluded in a report released April 10, that two BPD officers should be terminated and two others suspended connected to the Davis case. The report also indicates all the bullets found at the scene of the shooting were fired by police and a gun police said had Davis’ prints on it was never fired. The CRB report also notes inconsistencies in police testimony and internal affairs interviews.Davis’ wife, Kelly, has maintained her husband’s innocence from the beginning.“The ink is holding officers accountable saying that they did something so egregious on that day that they are calling for them to be terminated,” said Kelly Davis during a press conference, as she held the CRB report. “This is the ink that we’ve been waiting for. The fight does not stop until my husband crosses that threshold of my home.”Melba Saunders, of the State’s Attorney’s Office released a statement concerning the Davis case and the CRB report. “The Civilian Review Board is an important body to help bridge the gap of community distrust in the justice system. However, the board’s findings are separate and apart from the criminal proceedings currently pending against the defendant, for which we cannot comment. Therefore, the criminal investigation into the alleged actions of the defendant has no correlation with the use of force applied by the police in the apprehension of him,” Saunders stated.Jill Carter, director of the Baltimore Office of Civil Rights, which oversees the CRB, told the AFRO that out of 263 complaints considered by the CRB, 62 were sustained by the board and out of those 62, only two were upheld by the BPD.“I’m hoping this will highlight the need of the CRB to strengthen its authority,” Carter said.“When police have been allowed to police themselves, it has been a colossal failure.”Davis is scheduled to head to court for the murder charge next month.last_img read more