a month agoChelsea boss Lampard rules Rudiger out of Valencia clash

first_imgChelsea boss Lampard rules Rudiger out of Valencia clashby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea manager Frank Lampard has confirmed Antonio Rudiger will miss Tuesday’s Champions League clash with Valencia. The defender made his return from a long-term injury in Saturday’s win over Wolves.But Lampard says he suffered a groin injury in the clash and could potentially be out long-term once again.”Toni is injured,” Lampard confirmed. “At the weekend he bothered a small groin problem that he has been carrying the last couple of weeks so he is out. “He will have a scan later today to see where he is at. Hopefully it is not long-term.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Video: Oklahoma State’s LeBryan Nash Slammed Home One Of The Best Dunks Of The Year vs. Texas

first_imgLeBryan Nash throws down nasty dunk vs. Texas.Add LeBryan Nash to the list of players who have slammed home a basket that should be considered for the mythical dunk of the year award. During Oklahoma State’s game against Texas in Austin, the Cowboys’ forward basically dunked over Longhorn guard DeMarcus Holland. Check it out: This angle makes it even more impressive:Oklahoma State and Texas are currently in the second half of their contest. The game is being televised on the Longhorn Network.last_img

Vine: R.J. Hunter’s Cold-Blooded Three-Pointer Stunned No. 3 Seed Baylor

first_imgR.J. Hunter hits huge three vs. Baylor.Georgia State, the No. 14 seed in the West Region, just ended the game on a 13-0 run to shock No. 3 seed Baylor, 57-56. Georgia State guard R.J. Hunter, the son of GSU head coach Ron Hunter, hit the game-winning three-pointer from way downtown with 2.8 seconds remaining.Hunter struggled much of the day, scoring just two points in the first half. His dad coached the whole game in a rolling stool after tearing his left achilles tendon celebrating the team’s Sun Belt Conference championship last week.This is what happened to Ron Hunter when R.J. made his game-winner. March Madness is amazing.last_img

CBCRadioCanada reaffirms commitment to diversity and inclusion with new 201821 plan

first_imgMonique Marcotte, Vice-President of People and Culture, added: “This plan is rooted in the notion that our workplace culture must be truly inclusive in order to attract and retain top talent. Our strength lies in the unique perspectives that our employees bring to work each day. We want everyone to feel that their views and contributions are valued because they help us broaden our understanding of one another and better relate to the changing demographic makeup of our country.”This plan also complements the Diversity and Inclusion section of the career page of our corporate website. Both convey the importance of diversity and inclusion and share the many things we’re doing to make our programming content even more relevant, foster greater inclusiveness in our workplace culture and ensure our workforce fully reflects Canada’s demographics.About CBC/Radio-CanadaCBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster. Through our mandate to inform, enlighten and entertain, we play a central role in strengthening Canadian culture. As Canada’s trusted news source, we offer a uniquely Canadian perspective on news, current affairs and world affairs. Our distinctively homegrown entertainment programming draws audiences from across the country. Deeply rooted in communities, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We also deliver content in Spanish, Arabic and Chinese, as well as both official languages, through Radio Canada International (RCI). We are leading the transformation to meet the needs of Canadians in a digital world.Diversity and inclusion fact sheet: Our progress so farBelow are highlights of some of the initiatives that have resulted from our ongoing efforts to promote diversity and inclusion in our content, workplace culture and workforce:ContentCBC North has been serving Canadians across the territories and in Northern Quebec since 1958. It provides radio, television and online services to seven communities (Whitehorse, Yellowknife, Inuvik, Hay River, Iqaluit, Rankin Inlet, Kuujjuaq) in eight Indigenous languages. In addition to offering services on CBC North, our main networks and regional stations also showcase Indigenous news, issues, and culture.Our award-winning Indigenous Unit is both a resource and a catalyst for more coverage across CBC/Radio-Canada. Recently expanded to more communities, it is helping us identify, recruit and develop Indigenous talent. It’s creating programs like Unreserved on CBC Radio, a powerful one-hour platform on our national radio network for Indigenous voices. The Legends Project digitizes traditional oral stories, legends and histories of Canada’s Inuit and First Nations Peoples from communities across the country. Our CBC Indigenous and Radio-Canada’s Espaces autochtoneswebsites are ensuring more Canadians learn more about this country’s legacy and its future.Since December 2017, Radio-Canada makes it compulsory for independent producers who submit a project to present a “diversity inclusion plan” with the objective of improving diversity in all its content.CBC Films (CBC Breaking Barriers Film Fund) is a narrative feature film fund that supports the production of English-language films from filmmakers and creators who bring diverse voices and stories that engage and reflect Canadians on the big and small screens. We look for projects that are written and directed by Canadian women, Indigenous persons, visible minorities, LGBTQ persons and persons with a disability.For the past four years, Radio-Canada has been leading a TV industry working group aimed at increasing cultural diversity in French-language fiction. The group has implemented a series of actions such as the Auditions de la diversité, which provide performance training for actors from visible minority communities. The working group also supports coaching for young scriptwriters and tours high schools, in order to encourage diversity students to pursue careers in TV production.Workplace cultureA number of internal initiatives foster greater inclusiveness in our workplace culture, including:The Developing Emerging Leaders Program equips an annual cohort of 15 diverse employees with insights, tools and strategies to skillfully take their careers to the next level.Employee Resource Groups (bring together employees who share common backgrounds and experiences, and provide mutual support and a greater sense of belonging, ex. women in technology and employees with physical or mental disabilities and their allies.)Both CBC and Radio-Canada offer paid journalism internships to Indigenous recruits with partners such as the First Nations University of Canada, Nunavut Sivuniksavut/Algonquin College and the First Nations Education Council (FNEC). Radio-Canada also collaborates with the Kiuna Institution (the Quebec post-secondary Indigenous college) to offer an initiation to journalism for Indigenous students.Our senior leaders learn about inclusive leadership and unconscious bias. That awareness fosters a culture of inclusiveness—one of our core values. Similar training is provided to other employees across the organization. “We want to make sure all Canadians are heard on our airwaves; that they—and their children—see themselves reflected on their public broadcaster,” said Catherine Tait, CBC/Radio-Canada’s President and CEO. “This plan sets clear objectives and a roadmap to get there. It builds on the work we’ve been doing to make our content, our workforce and our services better reflect all Canadians.”Building on past efforts and accomplishments, including those resulting from our previous 2015-2018 strategy, the new plan lays out the objectives for the coming years, provides workforce results for all our main business units, and details action plans by major services. WorkforceWhile our focus is not on targets, we do still monitor to measure our performance and the impact of our initiatives.The new diversity hires (Indigenous Peoples, members of visible minorities, persons with disabilities) result for Q1 2018-2019 of 27.2% exceeded our target of 25.4%. This is our best first quarter result since we started measuring this index in 2015-2016.We are the gender parity leader in the Canadian media industry with 48.9% women employed across CBC/Radio-Canada (+6.1% above the external labour force).We reached our Strategy 2020 goal of 2.1% for Indigenous representation, meeting the external labour force availability and the hiring rate of 3.1% surpassed this goal between April 2017 and March 2018.Between April 2015 and 2018, we saw over 40% increases for both the number of members of visible minorities and persons with disabilities. Login/Register With: Advertisement OTTAWA – CBC/Radio-Canada has unveiled its 2018-21 Diversity and Inclusion Plan. The new three-year plan sets out our strategy to better serve all Canadians by reflecting the full range of Canadian perspectives through our content, workplace culture and workforce. The Plan was launched at CBC/Radio-Canada’s Annual Public Meeting in Edmonton, where diversity and inclusion inspired this year’s conversation with Canadians on the importance of public broadcasting in today’s environment. With a view to increasing the diversity of its News staff, Radio-Canada revamped its hiring process for journalists at the network and regional levels over the last year, and we have removed potential obstacles for diverse candidates in our general knowledge and language proficiency exams.The candidates for the first-ever paid CBC Placements for Persons With Disabilities started in mid-September 2018and a national launch is being considered if deemed successful.We are the first Canadian media company to add gender and sexual diversity (i.e., LGBTQ+) to its voluntary workforce tracking metrics.center_img Facebook Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

Football Michigan offense starts with the run game

OSU junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis (59) takes his position during their game on Nov. 19, 2016 at Spartan Stadium. The Buckeyes won 17-16. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo EditorMichigan played its first game of the season without redshirt sophomore quarterback Wilton Speight last week, and if they proved one thing in their 20-10 victory over Indiana, it’s that its offense now relies almost solely on the shoulders of senior running back De’Veon Smith.Even if the injured Speight does return against Ohio State, Smith will still likely be considered the most crucial part of the Michigan offense.The senior running back set a career-high with 158 rushing yards in last Saturday’s victory over the Hoosiers and accounted for both of Michigan’s touchdowns.This trend is not something that has been entirely alien to their offense, however. Of the 60 touchdowns scored this season by the Maize and Blue, 39 have come on the ground while only 17 have come through the air and two have come on defensive plays. Smith is responsible for 10 of those rushing touchdowns.But this style of rushing offense is a bit different from one that the Buckeyes have faced in other games this year. The Wolverines run with a pro-style offense, meaning they rely heavily on the play of the offensive line and count on their quarterbacks being styled more to pass than to run.The play of the running backs is different than that of most other college-style offenses, but junior linebacker Chris Worley knows exactly what to expect out of the running backs.“It’s not going to be guys trying to run around you,” Worley said. “It’s going to be guys trying to run through your face.”OSU redshirt junior cornerback Gareon Conley said in this game, the defense will have to focus more on stopping Smith and the rushing offense than their air attack.“They don’t throw the ball as much because they run the ball a lot,” Conley said. “But we’ll be forced to stop the run and play the pass whenever it comes.”Facing a run-heavy offense, the Buckeyes should feel confident about their chances in slowing down Smith given how their defense has played against the run this year. OSU ranks 18th in fewest rush yards allowed per game and has only allowed four touchdowns to be scored on the ground, tied for second among FBS teams. They have also only allowed opponents to average 3.39 yards per carry, good for 18th fewest among FBS schools. For redshirt junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis, that ability to plug up the run comes down to more than just preparation, it rests on the defensive line’s mentality.“It doesn’t really matter to me, because every team has their scheme with what they’re going to do,” Lewis said. “At the end of the day, it’s about who’s going to put their hand in the dirt and just going. You can play whatever formation you want to play, we’re going to play whatever defense we have to to dominate.”In Michigan’s 14-13 loss two weeks ago to Iowa, Speight suffered a broken collarbone on his left side. Filling in for the redshirt sophomore was redshirt junior quarterback John O’Korn, a transfer from the University of Houston. O’Korn failed to deliver much as he finished the game with only seven completed passes in 16 attempts for a total of 59 yards. He was also only capable of running for 19 yards on six rush attempts.For a time, it appeared O’Korn was headed towards his second career start in a Wolverine uniform as many early reports indicated Speight was unable to play for the remainder of the regular season. However, Speight has not officially been ruled out and now rumors emerge that he could still be Saturday’s starting quarterback.The signal caller at the beginning of the season, Speight had given the Wolverines a starting quarterback with the ability to provide the team with a strong air attack. He had completed 160 of his 257 attempted passes for a 62.3 percent completion rate, thrown for 2,156 yards and had 15 touchdown passes to only four interceptions. Lewis acknowledges that while it isn’t easy to prepare when such an important position remains a question mark, the team will be prepared by Saturday to face whomever is behind center.“It could be rough depending on if one’s a runner or not,” Lewis said. “They have a really solid foundation with what they’re going to do: run the ball, throw when necessary.” read more

Bucks lose Pettrey for regular season

Ohio State kicker Aaron Pettrey will have surgery Tuesday to repair a torn medial collateral ligament, or MCL, in his right knee and could miss the remainder of the regular season.Pettrey suffered the injury during a kickoff late in the second quarter of OSU’s 45-0 victory over New Mexico State on Saturday.He is expected to miss four to six weeks, leaving open the possibility of playing in the Buckeyes’ bowl game.Junior Devin Barclay, a 26-year-old walk-on, replaced Pettrey on Saturday and missed two of his three field goal attempts.Pettrey has made 13 of 19 field goal attempts on the season.

Ohio States Jessica Porvasnik eyes championships LPGA

Then-freshman Jessica Porvasnik holds her follow-through after a shot during fall practice in 2013 at the OSU Golf Club. Porvasnik played in the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open after being named Big Ten Player of the Year as a freshman.Credit: Courtesy of OSU athleticsAfter a summer of teeing it up with the professionals in the U.S. Women’s Open, some coaches and teammates said Jessica Porvasnik will be back with the pros soon enough.Porvasnik, a sophomore on the Ohio State women’s golf team, had quite the summer. After finishing her freshman season by being named the Big Ten Player of the Year, Big Ten individual champion and honorable mention All-American, Porvasnik went on to qualify for the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open in May.“Something that I want to do one day is definitely go play in the LPGA (Ladies Professional Golf Association) tour so it was really cool to play with some of the people I’ve always looked up to and get the experience,” Porvasnik said.Porvasnik’s coach sees Porvasnik playing on tour one day, too. Coach Therese Hession said she is excited to see a glimpse of what the future may hold for the Hinckley, Ohio, native.   “I got to see her the second round (at the U.S. Open). She just looked like she belonged,” Hession said. “I know she even made a comment to her mom saying, ‘Three years from now, this will be my job.’”Porvasnik said, though, she doesn’t plan on leaving OSU any sooner than three years.“It’s like a thought but it would never happen. My mom is the one who says ‘No, you’re getting your degree before you leave,’ so no, it would probably never happen,” she said.Senior teammate Claudia Lim also said she believes Porvasnik will play with the professionals one day.“She’ll play on the LPGA tour, for sure,” Lim said. “She has the potential and all the characteristics to be a great leader.” Now that Porvasnik is back from playing the fairways of Pinehurst Resort & Country Club in Pinehurst, N.C., at the U.S. Women’s Open, she is ready to chase a collegiate championship with her teammates. She was one of the 42 women named on the Big Ten Women’s Golfers to Watch List this season, along with teammates redshirt-sophomore Zoe-Beth Brake and sophomore Katja Pogacar. “For the team, I know our goal is to definitely do really well in the Big Ten again and individually. I had a really good year last year, so I want to improve on that this year,” Porvasnik said. Hession said she is expecting to see a great season from Porvasnik as well, and she hopes that the sophomore will take her experiences from the summer to lead her team. “This summer she got to play with the best in the world at the U.S. Open. I think she’ll draw on those experiences and now she knows more what to expect in college golf,” Hession said.Porvasnik is scheduled to start her sophomore season as a Buckeye on Monday when OSU is set to play in the Chip-N-Club Invitational in Lincoln, Neb. The tournament is scheduled to last through Tuesday. read more

Napolis astonishing comeback seals win against Milan

first_imgNapoli completed an extraordinary comeback from 2-0 down to beat Milan 3-2 under thirty minutes at the Stadio San Paolo.Jack Bonaventura’s acrobatic half-volley and a Davide Calabria angled drive had put Gennaro Gattuso’s men firmly in control at the Stadio San Paolo.However, as they did last week at Lazio, Carlo Ancelotti’s side fought back for the victory.A Piotr Zielinski’s smartly-taken double restored parity for the Naples side before substitute Mertens then pounced at the back-post to complete an unlikely comeback win for Carlo Ancelotti’s new club.Cristiano Ronaldo, JuventusSerie A Betting: Match-day 3 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Considering there is a number of perfect starts so early in the Serie A season, as well as a few surprisingly not-so perfect ones….It was also a notable night for David Ospina’s first start for the hosts since his summer move from Arsenal.The Naples outfit now sit joint-top of the early Serie A table alongside champions Juventus, having both maintained their perfect starts on Saturday.Napoli pushed Juventus all the way in the title race last season and will be hopeful of going one better this time around.last_img read more

5 Alaska Grown Challenge

first_imgParticipating retailers will create specialty Alaska Grown displays in their stores that prominently place and showcase the Alaska Grown products they carry, making them easy for customers to find. From June through October, Alaskans are encouraged to spend $5 every week on Alaska Grown products at their local grocery stores.  Division Director Arthur Keyes: “We have one of the cleanest growing environments in the world, and when you buy Alaska Grown, you are not only getting a fresher, quality product, you are also supporting our in-state economy.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Division of Agriculture is launching its second annual $5 Alaska Grown Challenge to support the growth of Alaska’s agriculture industry. The challenge will run for the five-month period when Alaska Grown products are most available.last_img read more

Player Spotlight on Megan Hensley

first_imgEpisode 18: Megan HensleyThe Hensley FileNumber:10Full name: Megan HensleyNickname: MegPosition: RHP/OFBats/Throws: R/RHometown:  Ashland, Ky.High School: Ashland Paul BlazerTravel Team: Louisville SluggersMajor: Exercise ScienceFun Fact: Hobbies include mountain biking, hiking and hunting Print Friendly Version The University of Louisville Softball Player Spotlight series features short interviews with each of the Cardinals’ players. Episode 18 features senior Megan Hensley. Story Linkslast_img

Discussed food and spices with PM MODI Chef Sanjeev Kapoor

first_imgCliched as it may seem for chefs to love their spices, for Sanjeev Kapoor, one of the most celebrated ones on television, that was the topic of an ‘interesting’ discussion when he met Prime Minister Narendra Modi and whipped a meal up for him in Abu Dhabi.During Modi’s trip to Abu Dhabi in August, Kapoor was flown in specially to prepare a vegetarian meal for the strictly vegetarian prime minister.“I spent over an hour with the prime minister and we were only talking about food and spices and the treatment through spices. It was interesting to discuss with the PM the correct use of spices and the miracles they can do when used correctly,” Kapoor told reporters when he was capital. Chef Kapoor also eagerly shared an anecdote Modi had related to him. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“The PM told me the story of someone he knows, who had a heart issue and doctors said nothing could be done to correct it. Then he was advised to empty a capsule and fill it with freshly ground red chilli. He (Modi) said the man never had a problem after that,” said the chef, recalling his hour-long conversation with the prime minister. The right combination of spices are the trick to dish out the best food,” Kapoor said. “For me, when I’m cooking with Indian food, spices are very important as I literally have to breathe them. The use of spices makes Indian food unique,” Kapoor added. He said a combination of cumin, clove, pepper and cardamom are his favourites from his spice-box and, barring cumin, he can even use the other three in his desserts! Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“All these spices —cumin, clove, pepper and cardamom are so diverse that they can create magic by changed combinations. One can accentuate pepper, underlay it with cloves, with a hint of cumin and cardamom, it’s like a whole another world,” said Kapoor as his senses came alive while speaking of spices. It is only Indian food that can take as little as two or three spices to as many as 20 in the same dish, unlike any other cuisine in the world, Kapoor added. Through his cookery shows as well, he always tries to bring in relevance to food to suit the times, Kapoor said, adding that it doesn’t mean that he serves the same at his restaurants as is depicted on his TV shows.“For the very reason, that I know how to target my audience and I know what to sell, that all my books sell so well. One needs to know what to write so as to make it sell,” the celebrity chef added.His chain of restaurants, Yellow Chilli, would soon be hitting the Gulf markets in Dubai, Saudi Arabia and other places within the next four months, he added.last_img read more

Google Is Adding FactChecked Medical Info to Search Results

first_img Let’s be honest: the Internet has made slight hypochondriacs of us all. According to Google, one in 20 Google searches are conducted in the quest for health information, which is why the search giant is doubling down on the medical information it presents.Starting this week, whenever you key in an illness-related search on Google, you’ll get a snapshot of medical facts right upfront. For example, if you type in “migraines” or “food allergies” into the search box, now a white box will come up in the top right hand corner of the screen with a description of the ailment, with links to causes, symptoms, tests, treatments, prognosis, prevention and the National Library of Medicine. The info is accompanied by a line cautioning users to “consult a doctor if you have a medical concern.”Related: Cubicles Were Originally Designed to Set Us Free and Now They’re Slowly Killing UsProduct manager Prem Ramaswami explained in a company blog post that the search information was put together by a team of doctors led by Dr. Kapil Parahk, and M.D., MPH and Ph.D who taught at Johns Hopkins and worked with the White House before joining Google, and was fact-checked by medical doctors at the Mayo Clinic and Google. While the new feature is intended to be useful, Ramaswami warned that it isn’t meant to serve as medical advice. “We know that cases can vary in severity from person to person, and that there are bound to be exceptions,”  he wrote in a blog post. “What we present is intended for informational purposes only—and you should always consult a healthcare professional if you have a medical concern. But we hope this can empower you in your health decisions by helping you learn more about common conditions.”Back in October, Google was reportedly piloting a new feature that allowed users who look up health symptoms to video chat with a doctor instantly. The company is also said to be developing an ingestible cancer-detecting pill and contact lenses that monitor blood sugar.Related: 23andMe’s Database of Genetic Information Is Going to Make It Lots of Money February 10, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.center_img 2 min read Register Now »last_img read more

Blender 28 beta released with a revamped user interface and a highend

first_imgThe Blender team released beta version 2.8 of its Blender, a free and open-source 3D creation software, earlier this week. Blender 2.8 beta comes with new features and updates such as EEVEE, a high-end Viewport, Collections, Cycles, and 2D animation among others. Blender is a 3D creation suite that offers the entirety of the 3D pipeline including modeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing, and motion tracking. It allows video editing as well as game creation. What’s new in Blender 2.8 Beta? EEVEE Blender 2.8 beta comes with EEVEE, a new physically based real-time renderer. EEVEE works as a renderer for final frames, and also as the engine driving Blender’s real-time viewport. It consists of advanced features like volumetrics, screen-space reflections and refractions, subsurface scattering, soft and contact shadows, depth of field, camera motion blur and bloom. A new 3D Viewport There’s a new and modern 3D viewport that was completely rewritten. It can help optimize the modern graphics cards as well as add powerful new features. It consists of a workbench engine that helps visualize your scene in flexible ways. EEVEE also helps power the viewport to enable interactive modeling and painting with PBR materials. 2D Animation There are a new and improved 2D drawing capabilities, which include a new Grease Pencil. Grease Pencil is a powerful and new 2D animation system that was added, with a native 2D grease pencil object type, modifier, and shader effects. In a nutshell, it helps to create a user-friendly interface for the 2D artist. Collections Blender 2.8 beta introduces ‘collections’, a new concept that lets you organize your scene with the help of Collections and View Layers. Cycles Blender 2.8 beta comes with a new feature called Cycles that includes new principled volume and hair shaders, bevel and ambient occlusion shaders, along with many other improvements and optimizations. Other features Dependency Graph: In blender 2.8 beta, the core object evaluation and computation system have been rewritten. Blender offers better performance for modern many-core CPUs as well as for new features in the future releases. Multi-object editing: Blender 2.8 beta comes with multiple-object editing that allows you to enter edit modes for multiple objects together. For more information, check out the official Blender 2.8 beta release notes. Read Next Mozilla partners with Khronos Group to bring glTF format to Blender Building VR objects in React V2 2.0: Getting started with polygons in Blender Blender 2.5: Detailed Render of the Earth from Spacelast_img read more

Intelsat 33e Multiple headwinds including price co

first_imgIntelsat 33eMultiple headwinds including price competition reflecting over-supply of wide-beam capacity, compounded with currency challenges contributed to a 9% drop in second quarter revenue for Intelsat to US$542 million, and a decline in EBITDA of 13% to US$411 million.Intelsat said that downward trend would continue ahead of the entry into service of four new satellites launched this year, which it said would generate incremental revenue in the second half.Media revenue was US$211 million in the quarter, down 5% thanks to the transition of some US customers to more efficient compression standards and the impact of currency fluctuations in Russia.2Q media business was driven by distribution in Asia, Europe and Latin America. Intelsat said that media business growth would be delivered by the entry into service of Intelsat 31 this month and the launch of Intelsat 36 in August, which supports South African DTH from 68.5° East. The satellite will enter service in the fourth quarter.Intelsat’s order backlog slipped over the quarter but remains healthy, with orders of US$9.2 billion as against US$9.3 billion in March.The company said it would compete for an estimated US$3.3 billion in incremental revenue opportunity through to 2021 that will be generated by applications including enterprise broadband, wireless infrastructure, the Internet of Things and commercial and maritime applications.The company said its 2016 launch programme remains on track with Intelsat 33e and Intelsat 36 scheduled to launch from French Guiana in August.Intelsat said that it has singed 20 new contracts for its next-generation high throughput Epic NG fleet since April 27, including TIM Brazil.last_img read more

Making money is first and foremost about backing t

first_imgMaking money is first and foremost about backing the right people.Next, it’s about timing.Casey Research readers have had great success by identifying, following, and backing up-and-coming stars. The best of the best in the business.          In this video, Louis James from Casey Research introduces you to two innovators of tomorrow.These are two people whom smart investors are following very closely.last_img

In Case You Missed It… Tonight at 8 pm ET leg

first_img In Case You Missed It… Tonight at 8 p.m. ET, legendary speculator Doug Casey will host an exclusive FREE training webinar called “Doug Casey’s Biggest Speculation in History.” Doug’s never done anything like this before. But right now, he’s more interested in this rare investment situation than any other—and he’s so convinced this is something you need to do, that for the first time, he has put together this extended free training for you. Click here to register immediately. — Justin’s note: Yesterday, I told you why every government in the world is nervous about bitcoin…and why it’s set to move even higher from here. Today, I’m continuing this theme by sharing a new interview featuring Teeka Tiwari, one of the best cryptocurrency analysts in the world.Below, Teeka tells Palm Beach Daily analyst Nick Rokke why he underestimated bitcoin and why you should add some to your portfolio today. He also reveals where he thinks bitcoin’s price is headed in 2018… Nick: Who attends a cryptocurrency party? Teeka: This one had a lot of young entrepreneurs. But these weren’t your typical, foolhardy young entrepreneurs. These were really sophisticated guys. What was different about these guys from other entrepreneurs I’ve seen in the past is they already have existing businesses. One young man I met has 300,000 users on his blockchain application. Another person had 200,000 people on his platform. This is a big difference from the deals we’ve seen so far, which have been little more than a good idea and a white paper. The quality of projects coming to market in 2018 is very high. Nick: What does that mean for investors? Teeka: It means there will be a lot more opportunities to profit from cryptocurrencies. And the big boys are taking notice. They’re excited about these new projects. Over 1,700 people attended this conference. And most of them were from hedge funds, venture capital firms, family offices, and endowment funds. These are all people who are slinging around billions of dollars. And they’re all excited about investing in the cryptocurrency market. They wanted to meet these young entrepreneurs. That’s the biggest thing I noticed… the amount of institutional demand for cryptocurrencies that’s out there. I vastly underestimated how badly institutions want to get into this space… vastly underestimated. Justin’s note: As I mentioned, Teeka is one of the world’s leading crypto experts. He’s traveled the world and met with the top insiders to learn as much as he can about the booming crypto market. And his boots-on-the-ground research has helped his subscribers make life-changing returns following his recommendations. He currently has five crypto plays in his Palm Beach Letter portfolio, with an average gain of 3,270%. But don’t worry if you haven’t bought cryptos yet. There’s still time to get rich off this boom. You can learn how by enrolling in Teeka’s Crypto Millionaire Master Plan. This crash course teaches you everything you need to know about cryptos. Click here to get started. Nick: How’s that possible? You’ve been talking about the tidal wave of money coming into cryptos all year. Teeka: It’s not going to be a tidal wave… It’s going to be the biggest ocean of money in the history of the world. And that money hasn’t even hit the markets yet. The opportunity in cryptos is just beginning. But back to your question. Here’s why institutional demand is much bigger than I initially thought… These institutional investors will be able to trade the new bitcoin futures contracts later this year. But that’s not the same as owning physical bitcoin. Right now, they can’t own bitcoin because of an issue called “custody.” You see, these large funds can’t hold onto their own investments. Most of them have contracts that state a third party will hold onto their assets as a custodian. This rule is in place to protect investors from potential fraud. So, these funds have institutions like Morgan Stanley or Goldman Sachs have “custody” of their investments. There are no institutional-grade custodians for cryptocurrencies yet. They need that piece in place before they can put money to work in the actual bitcoin market. Think about it being the difference between owning a futures contract on gold and actually owning gold bars. A futures contract can be held in a brokerage account whereas a gold bar needs to be held in a physical vault. As I said, right now there are no bitcoin “vaults” approved for institutional use. The good news is that will change next year. A slew of new companies is rising up to meet the custody challenge. Once custody is in place, the stage will be set for institutions to trade in the physical bitcoin market. And when that happens, billions—or even trillions—of dollars will be flowing into the space. And I hope everyone has an allocation to bitcoin before this money flows in. The move is going to be huge. Nick: What will all this institutional money do for the price of bitcoin? Teeka: I recently told my Palm Beach Confidential subscribers that bitcoin will reach $25,000 next year. And I am very confident it will reach that point. Some analysts at the conference project a bitcoin price of $300,000 by 2022. That’s not unreasonable. So, my price may be on the conservative side. Nick: Thank you for talking to us again, T. Have fun in Bogotá. Teeka: No problem. Recommended Link Silicon Valley Rocket Scientist’s December 19th Prediction Could Lead to 35,000% Growth Watch him lay out his bold prediction in full detail here.center_img — Nick Rokke, analyst, The Palm Beach Daily: T, you just left Consensus in New York… It’s one of the biggest cryptocurrency conferences in the world. What was it like? Teeka Tiwari, editor, The Palm Beach Letter: The energy there is incredible. It’s exciting. And all these guys want to network… get to know each other, and talk cryptos. It’s a new field and there are no established players yet. And if you’re not out there networking, you’re going to be left behind. I only planned to stay one night… But I stayed longer. I kept getting invited to private events hosted by hedge funds and initial coin offering (ICO) projects. I find some of my best ideas at these events. One party I attended was hosted by Mike Novogratz. He’s the manager of the biggest crypto hedge fund in the world. And he was one of the first Wall Street guys to realize the importance of cryptos. A couple years ago, Mike invested $500,000 in ether when it was under $1 per coin. He’s been following the space for a while. So, I wasn’t going to turn down an invite to his party. Reader Mailbag Today, a reader weighs in on cryptos: FREE EVENT TONIGHT: Doug Casey’s #1 Speculation for 2018 Tonight, legendary speculator Doug Casey is holding an emergency briefing to reveal “the biggest speculation in history”… It’s about a trend that could make you a lot of money in 2018… and Doug’s giving away the names of three stocks from his watchlist to all attendees… Click here to register for free. Recommended Link Hi. I am new to all this. I have never really invested on my own. I have looked into bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The reason I am interested in this is the world wants to go to a cashless society so digital currency makes sense in a way. I really have no retirement and am looking for something.—Calvinlast_img read more

first_img— — • These stocks soared because Trump made it his mission to revive the U.S. coal industry… Trump did this for a couple of reasons. Number one, he wants to bring back coal mining jobs. He also believes that a strong domestic coal industry “protects our national security, public safety, and economy from intentional attacks and natural disasters.”But don’t worry if you missed out on this big move in coal stocks.That’s because Trump could soon spark another big rally in energy stocks… and this one could blow the move we saw in coal stocks out of the water.I’ll show you how to position yourself for this in a minute. But first, let me tell you what Trump’s up to…• On June 1, Trump issued a controversial directive…He told Energy Secretary Rick Perry to take “immediate steps” to ensure that coal-fired and nuclear power plants stay open.I say “controversial” because many people don’t think Trump should be supporting coal over cleaner energy sources. Other critics warned that the move could raise energy prices.Still, I expect Trump to follow through on this.That’s because the White House has already instructed the Department of Energy (DOE) to place a two-year moratorium on nuclear power plant closures. The Trump administration is also considering a plan that would direct regional transmission companies to buy power from coal and nuclear plants.Trump’s calling for these measures because he wants to ensure a reliable energy source and to “promote the national defense and maximize domestic energy supplies.”If this goes through, it would be an unprecedented intervention by the federal government into the domestic energy market. It would also likely have massive implications for one commodity. And no, not coal. Recommended Link Recommended Link Why the Next Mega Bull Market Is NOT in StocksDr. Steve Sjuggerud says that another, hidden Melt Up is just beginning. Prices are as cheap today as they were in 1991. Full details here… Trump Declares National Emergency President Trump has mobilized his entire Administration to battle this problem by declaring it a National Emergency under federal law. And Congress just approved $6 billion to fight it. Now a company is joining the battle by tackling one of the biggest problems our country has ever faced. In the past, companies in this niche saw peak gains of 95,800%, 63,400%, even 216,100%. Could this new company be the next to ride this unique wave? Get all the details here before it’s too late. • I’m talking about uranium… The primary fuel used in nuclear power plants.It’s also one of the world’s most dependable energy sources. Unlike many renewable energies, it’s a form of base power. It provides power around the clock. It doesn’t matter if the wind’s blowing or if the sun’s shining.Uranium is also one of the world’s cheapest sources of energy.• Because of these advantages, uranium accounts for about 20% of America’s power needs… But get this… The United States only produces about 7% of the uranium it uses.The rest comes from abroad. And about one-third comes from Russia, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan, which is problematic for obvious reasons.In short, America’s uranium supply is incredibly fragile. This is why Trump’s putting U.S. nuclear energy “first.”In his eyes, it’s a matter of economic and national security. And I expect Trump to do a lot more for the nuclear energy industry in the coming years.• Energy Fuels and Ur-Energy are calling for major reforms to America’s uranium industry… Energy Fuels and Ur-Energy are two of America’s biggest uranium producers.Recently, they asked the U.S. Commerce Department to radically rethink its uranium policies. Specifically, they requested that 25% of all U.S. uranium be purchased from U.S. producers for national security reasons. That’s about three times more uranium than U.S. producers currently provide. They also think that U.S. agencies should be required to buy all uranium from domestic sources. • Now, companies lobby for changes like this all the time… Often their requests fall on deaf ears.But I think Trump will take this request seriously. After all, he’s already shown a serious commitment to reviving the country’s nuclear power.And here’s the thing…• Trump won’t have to do much for uranium to skyrocket… Again, that’s because uranium is already dirt cheap.It’s down 83% since 2007. And it’s down about 34% over the past three years. That makes it the worst-performing major commodity, according to Palisade Research.More importantly, the uranium price is now below the industry-wide cost of production. This means the typical uranium producer is losing money.This isn’t sustainable. Sooner or later, the price of uranium will rise. And when it does, watch out. We could have a “rip your face off” rally on our hands.But don’t just take my word it…• Doug Casey’s extremely bullish on uranium, too… A few days ago, Doug said in an interview that “uranium may be my single favorite commodity.”Doug also said that now’s a better time to buy uranium than it was before the last major bull market.Keep in mind, the price of uranium soared from $10 to $140 during the last bull market. The best uranium stocks went 20-to-1 or 50-to-1. Some even went 100-to-1.So, consider speculating on uranium stocks if you haven’t yet.The safest way to do this is with the Global X Uranium ETF (URA). It allows you to bet on a basket of uranium stocks, which is less risky than buying individual stocks.Just understand that uranium stocks are extremely volatile.Blue-chip uranium stocks can swing 5% or more in day. Junior uranium stocks can move 20% or more.If you can’t handle that volatility, you should stay on the sidelines. And if you’re willing to speculate, don’t bet more money than you can afford to lose. Use stop losses. And take profits when you get them.Regards, Justin Spittler Lima, Peru June 20, 2018P.S. Crisis Investing editor Nick Giambruno is also bullish on uranium. He’s dedicated a section of his portfolio to the best uranium plays he’s found. And all are still buys today. You can access these names—and all of Nick’s research on the sector—with a subscription to Crisis Investing. Reader MailbagAre you planning on investing in uranium? Let us know your thoughts on this idea—and any questions or suggestions you have for the Dispatch—right here. By Justin Spittler, editor, Casey Daily Dispatch“America First.”Donald Trump has been pledging this since the campaign trail. And unlike some of his promises, Trump’s stayed true to these words.He’s already put America first when it comes to trade, national security, immigration, and most recently outer space.Now, you might not agree with these policies. But the Dispatch isn’t about politics. It’s about making money.And you can’t deny that Trump’s “America First” approach has helped spark some huge market moves.Just look at this chart. It shows the performance of the VanEck Vectors Coal ETF (KOL) compared to the S&P 500 since Trump’s inauguration.You can see that KOL rose up to 49% at its peak after Trump’s inauguration… compared to a 27% peak gain for the S&P 500.last_img read more

With guest host John DonvanFor several months th

first_imgWith guest host John Donvan.For several months, the Childrens Health Insurance Program (CHIP) was in limbo. Its budget expired and Congress took no action to reauthorize it. Then, relief came as part of the bill that ended the government shutdown last week.But the future of another vital health service remains uncertain. The more than 10,000 community health centers that treat low-income Americans have not seen a funding reauthorization.The centers, funded by the Affordable Care Act, retain bipartisan support, The Hill quotes Republican Senator Tom Cole saying “I certainly didn’t support Obamacare but I think one of the good provisions was the expansion of the community health centers … I think they’re a wonderful model. They’re a much cheaper way to deliver care to people that really need it. So, again, I think there is a commitment there to find a solution.”What will become of the centers where an estimated one in 13 Americans gets care?GUESTSJames Macrae, Associate Administrator, Bureau of Primary Health Care,Health Resources and Services Administration,U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesLeighton Ku, Professor and Director of the Center for Health Policy Research, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington UniversityDan Hawkins, Senior VP of Public Policy & Research,National Association of Community Health CentersKim Wagenaar, Chief Executive Officer, Cabarrus Rowan Community Health CentersFor more, visit https://the1a.org.© 2018 WAMU 88.5 – American University Radio. Copyright 2018 WAMU 88.5. To see more, visit WAMU 88.5.last_img read more

At my babys sixmonth appointment a few months ba

first_imgAt my baby’s six-month appointment a few months back, I got a one-pager from the pediatrician titled “Starting Solid Foods.””It is critical that the baby develop a taste for rice cereal at the beginning, to offset the loss of iron from formula or breast milk,” it reads.Sounds serious. Then come the all caps: “THE FIRST TWO WEEKS OF FEEDING GIVE RICE CEREAL ONLY.” That is followed by advice to introduce pureed vegetables before fruits so the baby doesn’t develop a sweet tooth.I obediently went out and bought some sand-textured baby cereal. (Organic, of course.)”Oh no, we’re not doing that.” My spouse pointed me to a parenting book we had on the shelf. “There’s no need for cereals alone; they are bland and bulky and their iron benefits are overstated,” it reads. “The idea that you should introduce vegetables before fruits to avoid creating a sweet tooth is just an unfounded myth. A carrot has virtually the same amount of sugar as an apple.”Welcome to early parenthood’s barrage of contradictory advice. It tends to be detailed, with convincing internal logic. “Studies” are often invoked. And the stakes feel so high — like, if I do this wrong, will my baby be malnourished or end up a picky eater or not succeed in life somehow?Enter Brown University economics professor Emily Oster and her new book, Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, From Birth to Preschool. It’s the follow-up to her first book, Expecting Better, a deep look at the data behind pregnancy advice, which has a bit of a cult following. (I am in this cult.)In her new book, Oster ticks through big and small parenting dilemmas. She uses her training as an economist to look at the relevant research for each of them and to assess how much stock we should put in the findings.”What I do in the book is actually try to comb through these studies and figure out which of them are giving us the best information,” Oster says. “So then you can make these choices having the best information, not just the first thing that comes up when you Google it at 3 o’clock in the morning.”OK, so what about my solid-food dilemma? Yea or nay on rice cereal? Veggies first?”It turns out there isn’t any evidence to suggest that is a particularly important way to introduce foods or not,” she says. The answer to this one: You do you. Keep the food mushy, and don’t stress about it too much.This wasn’t my only point of confusion that this book cleared up, even though I’m nearly four years into parenthood. Here are a few of my personal takeaways.Nipple confusion is not a thing — you don’t need to wait three weeks after birth to give a pacifier or bottle. (This makes me feel better about giving my firstborn a pacifier on day two.)Baby milestones have a wide normal range, so don’t obsess. (Still vaguely worried that by nine months my baby should be clapping.)Breastfeeding does not help mom lose weight. (Crushed.)A lot of the other takeaways are kind of nuanced. They don’t give you a clear-cut answer, so much as information to help you make your own decision. One reason for that is designing a good study of the risks and benefits of a parenting decision is really hard. Take, for example, Chapter 4: “Breast Is Best? Breast Is Better? Breast Is About the Same?” Oster provides a path through the maze of conflicting advice by sifting out the convincing studies from the questionable ones.”Most of the studies on this are done by comparing the kids whose moms breastfeed to the kids whose moms don’t,” Oster says. “The issue with that is that the kind of moms who breastfeed are different than the moms who don’t, on average. So, in the U.S. in particular, moms who breastfeed tend to be better educated, higher income, more likely to be married.”(It’s unclear why that demographic breastfeeds more, Oster says, but the timing for the trend is connected to the public health push away from formula that began in the 1970s.) Now, let’s say you want to find out the impact of breastfeeding — and not of these demographic differences — on things like IQ and obesity.”When we narrow in on some studies that are better — like, for example, studies that compare siblings, where one sibling is breastfed and one sibling is not — those studies do not show the same kinds of impacts on long-term things like obesity or IQ,” Oster says.For the record, she found that there are some health benefits to breastfeeding, but they’re more limited than the hype. If it works for you and your family, Oster concludes, great; if not, formula is a good option.So, even if you’ve made a decision about how to introduce solids and whether to breastfeed or bottle-feed, there are so many other ones to make! What about baby nap schedules, how to potty train or the financial impact of choosing a nanny versus day care versus staying at home?As an economist, Oster advocates for taking some of the angst out of it. When making a parenting decision, she says, “Step one is to kind of really figure out what the best evidence says about the choice.” Look for randomized studies and big sample sizes.”But then there’s a really important second step, which is to combine that with what is going to work for your family,” she says.For instance, when she first brought her baby daughter home, she knew the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that your baby sleep in your room, ideally for the whole first year, as part of its safe infant sleeping environment guidance.”My husband did one day with our older daughter, and he was like, ‘I can’t believe it’s making those noises.’ He just couldn’t do it. He wouldn’t sleep,” she says. Room sharing for a full year was just not workable for her family.With Cribsheet, Oster is trying to make parents less confused, more confident in their choices and less judgmental of other parents who make different choices. Reading the book makes that feel surprisingly achievable. Laying out the research really strips these decisions of their drama, and you end up wondering why it all felt so overwhelming in the first place.When the time came to break out the solid foods with my baby, we did mashed sweet potato. A few months into it, emboldened by Oster’s book, we’ve gotten adventurous: This weekend at our Seder, baby even had a bit of brisket smushed up with horseradish. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

Tributes have been paid to Stephen Hawking the wo

first_imgTributes have been paid to Stephen Hawking, the world-renowned physicist and “disability icon” who was seen by many disabled people as a hugely-important role model, who died this week.Among the disabled people who highlighted the importance of his achievements was the political journalist Dr Frances Ryan, who said on Twitter: “Growing up disabled in Britain, you don’t get many role models.“But seeing a genius, witty and kind Prof gain the world’s respect from his wheelchair meant something. All of us know we can reach for the stars.”Professor Tom Shakespeare, professor of disability research at Norwich Medical School, said on Twitter that “as well as his brilliant career in Physics”, Hawking had “allied himself to the disability rights struggle time and again” and “always challenged assumptions”.He added: “Stephen Hawking showed that you could make strides, even if you couldn’t walk; that you could have a powerful voice, even if you couldn’t talk; that you could be disabled and change the world. RIP.”Another disabled campaigner, Kaliya Franklin, who tweets at @BendyGirl, said Hawking showed others that “the richness and depth of human experience is part of all [of] us, regardless of appearance or ability to speak out loud” and that he had showed that disabled people “could achieve anything, at a time when so many were still institutionalised”.There was also irritation from many disabled people at the repeated efforts of the mainstream media to hail Hawking as an “inspiration” for “overcoming” his impairment.Disabled scientist Fiona Robertson said on Twitter: “Don’t say he ‘overcame’ his illness.“He was still disabled. He was both disabled and brilliant, not ‘in spite of’.”Robertson was another who had seen Hawking as a role model.She said: “As a young teenager, my battered copy of A Brief History of Time revealed to me how much people yearn for the complexity of science, to understand reality, to connect with that awe.“As a disabled scientist, I looked to #StephenHawking to see that I still had a role to play.”She was one of many who pointed out that he was only able to be “the light of cosmology” because “he had access to medical care, social care, adaptive technology, mobility aids”.She added: “He succeeded because of his brilliance *and* his access to support.”Franklin agreed, pointing out that he was enabled to live his rich life by “the NHS, PAs to support independent living, PAs to support his work, assistive tech and most importantly, to be surrounded by people determined to ensure those things happen”.The Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds highlighted “the wondrous ways Professor Hawking explained the cosmos and its complex beauty” but also how he had supported disability rights, including criticising cuts to support for disabled students and fighting to protect the NHS.Marsha de Cordova, the disabled MP and Labour’s shadow minister for disabled people, said Hawking had been “a ground-breaking physicist, a firm advocate for the NHS, and a staunch defender of the welfare state and human rights – from opposing the Vietnam war to standing up for the Palestinian people” and had “never let his disability define him”.Disability Rights UK marked Hawking’s death by reposting the speech he gave as the fourth annual Jack Ashley Memorial Lecture last October.In the lecture, he spoke about his life with motor neurone disease, and his belief in the principles of the NHS, that good care should be provided “at the point of need, to everyone, without regard for personal circumstance, or ability to pay”.He added: “It is important that care is available, without any of the added burdens for people that come with private health insurance.“My team and I have had experience of dealing with health insurance companies in the US, and that disappointing experience shows that a health insurance company will try its best not to pay.”He also spoke in the lecture of his public row with Jeremy Hunt over the health secretary’s “cherry picking” of evidence on weekend NHS care, which Hawking said was “unacceptable”.He added: “International comparisons indicate that the most efficient way to provide good health care is for services to be publicly funded, and publicly run.“The more profit is extracted from the system, the more private monopolies grow, and the more expensive health care becomes.”He also said in his lecture that disabled people “must find new ways of doing things”.He said that he had travelled internationally, visited Antarctica, dived in a submarine, and experienced gravity-free space flight, as well as writing books, appearing in television programmes, and lecturing in the Royal Albert Hall.He told the audience: “I am not showing off. I am explaining that disabled people can do anything if they have a fierce will to succeed.”But he stressed, as other disabled people did this week after hearing of his death, that his international travel “involves an entourage of dedicated assistants and nurses, and my fame protects me against some of the types of indignity that we often suffer”.last_img read more