Turks and Caicos AG Chambers defends Civil Servant in false news attack

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, Turks and Caicos – July 17, 2017 – Fake or false news strikes again and this time it tried to take down the Registrar of Lands, Brandie Nova Anderson of Jamaica.  The Attorney General’s Chambers came to the defense of Ms Anderson and the Integrity Commissioned denounced that it is investigating the woman who has been Registrar of Lands since November 2014.No one knows who Joshua Pierre is, but that is the name put to a statement of a most damaging nature posted to social media about Anderson.It is said the statement was packed with lies and the AG has reported to the matter to the Police for investigation.  It was also explained in those Friday media releases that, “it is now very clear that some person or persons hiding behind the name “Joshua Pierre” made a malicious and damaging publication that has no basis in truth as it has been confirmed that no investigation into Ms. Anderson is being carried out by the Integrity Commission.”As for funds and how they are handled at the Lands department, there was this,   “The Government’s funds, including that, which have been appropriated to the Land Registry, are managed and paid through strict financial management and procurement procedures, and audited at the end of each Financial Year. There has been no finding to implicate Ms. Anderson of any wrongdoing since she commenced her service with TCIG.”The assault on the reputation of Anderson is called malicious.“All persons are reminded of the serious legal consequences of causing damage to the professional reputation of public officers who are merely seeking to carry out their functions in accordance with the high professional standards of the public service.”It was also explained that Ms. Anderson won the job of leading the Register of Lands through a fair and transparent process, a clean police record and she is also cited with having  “transformed the Lands Registry into an efficient operation in accordance with the requirements of the Registered Land Ordinance and has garnered the respect of her peers both within and outside of the public service.”#AGdefendscivilservant#IntegrityCommissiondeniesinvestigation#Andersonnotunderinvestigation#TCIGpublicservicestandard#FakenewsinTCI Related Items:#AGdefendscivilservant, #Andersonnotunderinvestigation, #FakenewsinTCI, #IntegrityCommissiondeniesinvestigation, #magneticmedianews, #TCIGpublicservicestandard Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

San Diego City Council approves funding for homeless navigation center

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The San Diego City Council yesterday approved funding for a navigation intake center for the homeless over the objections of four council members who said the center provides no shelter beds and guarantees no housing.The mayor agrees we need more housing but for now he’s focused on the short term needs of the homeless who are without shelter.In the meantime, the council has taken the lead on providing low cost housing by recently passed a resolution requesting each council district identify sites for 140 housing units that would get the city to 1260 units a number that would match the number of chronically homeless in the city.Additionally, the council hopes to expand the reach by including school districts land and property owned by the state. Steve Bosh, Posted: November 14, 2018 San Diego City Council approves funding for homeless navigation center November 14, 2018 Steve Bosh Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

San Diego police make 62 DUI arrests during holiday period

first_img Posted: July 6, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The California Highway Patrol arrested 62 drivers for suspicion of drunk driving in San Diego County over the holiday period, officials said today.While there were no fatalities on county freeways this year, the CHP said 17 people were killed in California during the July Fourth holiday period. The CHP holiday reporting period was from 6 p.m. Wednesday to 6 a.m. Saturday.The arrests for suspicion of DUI in the county increased over last year’s holiday period by 28. The CHP only tracks DUI arrests made by CHP officers.Statewide, three pedestrians were killed during the holiday period in the CHP’s jurisdiction. There were two motorcycle deaths reported statewide.This year there were 17 driving fatalities in California, as reported by all law enforcement agencies. Last year there were also 17. This year there were 839 arrests by CHP officers for suspicion of DUI throughout California. There were 389 last year. San Diego police make 62 DUI arrests during holiday period July 6, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

GameStop To Hold Fundraising Campaign For Autism Speaks This May Increase Employment

first_img(NOTE: GameStop is located at 246 Main Street in Wilmington.)GRAPEVINE, TX — GameStop is once again partnering with Autism Speaks to help increase awareness, understanding and acceptance of people with autism spectrum disorder. Throughout May, the video game retailer is focusing its annual in-store autism awareness campaign on raising funds for the newly launched NXT Gen Coders Program powered by GameStop and administered by Autism Speaks, aimed at increasing coding and programming skills for people with autism.From May 1 through May 31, GameStop will host its third annual in-store autism awareness campaign with 100 percent of donations going to Autism Speaks and helping fund the NXT Gen Coders Program. This program, powered by GameStop and administered by Autism Speaks, will focus on opportunities for coding and programing skill development for people with autism, so that they may be better equipped to take advantage of the one million jobs that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates will be open in the coding industry by 2020.With the vast majority of adults with autism unemployed or underemployed, GameStop and Autism Speaks are collaborating on the NXT Gen Coders Program to give talented young men and women a path to careers that match their training, abilities and interests.“We are proud to continue our commitment to raising awareness and providing support to the individuals and families impacted by autism,” says Jason Cochran, senior vice president of Store Operations for GameStop. “Through our ongoing partnership with Autism Speaks and the newly launched NXT Gen Coders Program, we are taking extra steps to provide individuals with autism the job and life skills they need to help them enjoy a more fulfilling life.”During this year’s campaign, GameStop is offering three ways guests can contribute to support people with autism:For the first-time, guests will have the option to donate up to 100 percent of their trade-in value to charity when they bring to GameStop their unused video game hardware, software, accessories, or consumer electronics.Donate $1 or more in-store or on GameStop.com and GameStop will provide triple PowerUp Rewards points on the donation amount.Donate PowerUp Rewards points to Autism Speaks in the PowerUp Rewards Center.GameStop’s continued support of Autism Speaks follows several successful campaigns since the partnership began in 2016, with more than $2.4 million in donations raised to enhance the quality of life for children, adults and families impacted by autism.“We appreciate GameStop’s generosity and commitment to the autism community,” said Autism Speaks President and CEO Angela Geiger. “Each year, 50,000 young people with autism enter adulthood, expanding a talent pool that is largely untapped. Creating employment opportunities requires innovative solutions, which is why we’re excited about the NXT Gen Coders Program.”(NOTE: The above press release is from GameStop.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedBUSINESS BRIEF: GameStop Awards $250,000 In Grants To Increase Employment Readiness For People With AutismIn “Business”GameStop Partners With Autism Speaks for Autism Awareness MonthIn “Business”GameStop Collects $1.2 Million in Donations During Autism Awareness MonthIn “Business”,Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.last_img read more

What AncestryDNA taught me about DNA privacy and the complex world of

first_img Share your voice Tags The hardest thing about having your DNA sequenced is generating a teaspoon’s worth of spit.They don’t tell you this in the marketing materials for your typical at-home DNA test kit, but producing enough saliva to fill a pen-sized tube up to its high spit mark is hard work — and strangely nerve-wracking, too.I sneak into an unused meeting room, chewing on air to generate slobber. The kit has two tubes. One, now full of my spit, and a second smaller tube with a chemical mix that stabilizes DNA. After uniting the two tubes, I stick the pale blue spit-mix into a box and mail it off to AncestryDNA, the genetics arm of the world’s largest genealogy company, Ancestry.In 2012 Ancestry launched the AncestryDNA service, which provides paying users the ability to build a timeline of their genes, search for relatives and understand what geographic regions their DNA originates from. Ancestry has sold 14 million kits since launch, and the number continues to grow as curious consumers turn to DNA to unravel their histories. The AncestryDNA kit Chris Linton So it’s not just me caught up in this craze — search for “Ancestry DNA results” on YouTube and you’ll find an entire subculture propped up by enthusiastic explorers probing their genetic histories. There’s a whole genre of evening TV dedicated to analyzing the family histories of the rich and famous. Over the last two years many DNA kit manufacturers have begun marketing their products as “perfect gifts.” In the 2018 Thanksgiving period, AncestryDNA broke its November sales record. Your DNA story has become this year’s hottest Christmas gift! Consumer genealogy tests have become big business practically overnight. Why are we so interested in finding out the secrets of our DNA?”I think the major appeal of DNA testing is to find out something new about us,” says Caitlin Curtis, a population geneticist at the University of Queensland. That’s certainly true for me, at least. My first thought is what revelations my spit might teach me about myself. But in the quest for answers, do we truly understand what kind of information we’re giving up?Related: The best DNA testing kits for 2019 Digging into your DNAThe almost unfathomable complexity of all life on Earth, from bacteria to humans, relies on DNA, but the DNA code itself is made up of just four letters: A, T, C and G.These letters, known as bases, always pair together the same way — A with T, C with G. The order in which these letters are arranged is what makes us different and gives us our unique traits. And because we hand parts of our DNA from parent to offspring, it also links us to the past. We just need to be able to “read” it and put all those bases in order. This is known as DNA sequencing. In the future, not even your DNA will be sacred Genealogy site credited with helping ID Golden State Killer suspect Best DNA Ancestry Testing Kits Now playing: Watch this: The genealogy craze 8 7:06 DNA data storage could solve a big problem Comments Who does that data belong to? It can be confusing, especially when these companies make deals with huge corporations to share their data.”I believe that there is an ethical obligation for these companies to be very upfront, honest and explain in simple terms to people what might happen to their data after they take a test, but that is not always the case,” says Curtis.AncestryDNA’s terms and conditions state that it “does not claim any ownership rights in the DNA submitted for testing” but by submitting a sample you effectively “grant AncestryDNA … a royalty-free, worldwide, sublicensable, transferable license to host, transfer, process, analyze, distribute, and communicate your Genetic Information for the purposes of providing you products and services.”It may be my DNA, but how it’s used in the future is something that AncestryDNA decides. However, there is a failsafe. The nuke-it-all option.”It’s your data, you should be able to do with it what you want,” Starr says. “If you decide at some point that you don’t want us to have it anymore, you can tell us to delete it and you can even tell us to destroy the DNA sample.”DNA as data”The biggest danger with handing control of your DNA data is the potential for discrimination based on that information,” says Curtis.Now that even our DNA is being digitized and stored in the infinite online filing cabinet of the World Wide Web, we must confront a reality in which our own genetic makeup can be hacked, stolen or used against us.”There are some parallels to broader conversations around how to govern our personal digital data online – and the possibility for it to be used in unanticipated ways in the future,” she continues.When we began signing up, en masse, for social media services such as Facebook and Twitter over a decade ago, we blindly shared our best baby photos and snarkiest thoughts with reckless abandon. Little did we know our personal data was being siphoned off insidiously and then used to target us in ad campaigns. And that data is still being generated and used today — Facebook gets to know exactly who we are in a matter of months. A cautionary tale, it would seem, considering genealogy testing has undergone rapid growth in the last two years. And though the science is getting better, the regulations and potential pitfalls are becoming harder to nail down.”It’s a complicated issue because in some countries there is protection against discrimination, and in some countries there are very few laws about what you can do with genetic data,” explains Curtis. In the US, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 prevents health insurers and employers from discriminating against you based on your genetic profile. However, in Australia, insurance companies can discriminate based on the results of a DNA test, increasing premiums or completely excluding coverage for certain diseases.Cool. Cool cool cool. Almost none of this research was done before I spat into a tube six or seven weeks ago, and now I realize my nerves weren’t about how much spittle I could produce. I jangled because I was diving headfirst into a world I thought I understood, but actually knew hardly anything about. There were voices gnawing at my subconscious. A devil on one shoulder, an angel on the other. One quietly trying to tell me that it’s kind of weird to give a private, multinational company access to the immutable information that can be used to identify me — and only me. The other saying “what can you lose?”You already know which one I listened to. I click through ready to solve this admittedly feeble personal mystery. But there are no shocking revelations. I end up with an ethnicity estimate that puts my DNA origins at 55 percent England, Wales and Northwestern Europe and 44 percent Ireland and Scotland.However, there’s also a zero to 1 percent chance my DNA comes from a region in West Africa that AncestryDNA pegs as relating to “Benin/Togo.” Surprising to me, but not unusual, according to Starr.”A 0-1 percent would say there might be something interesting here, but there might not,” he says. A result such as this might “fall out” in the future, as AncestryDNA’s databases continue to be refined by additional samples and research programs. My ethnicity estimate is only one half of the picture, however, because I can also look at my DNA matches, which directly correlates my DNA with that of other users in Ancestry’s database. In my case, it throws up two matches that AncestryDNA classes as “second cousins” — pretty close relatives of mine, according to my genes.I’ve never seen these people.And this is a caveat for the AncestryDNA kit. Your DNA might kick up matches with people you’ve never seen before, but if you want to fit them into your family tree, you need to subscribe to the other side of the Ancestry business to pore over how you might, potentially, be related to one another.  dnastoryMy ethnicity estimate had me at a 0 to 1 percent chance of having genetic heritage in Benin/Togo Jackson Ryan Digital DNA trailIn January, Buzzfeed News reported that FamilyTreeDNA, another huge provider of at-home DNA kits, had given the FBI access to its database of over a million profiles. The company provides the FBI with the ability to upload genetic profiles from crime scenes to FamilyTree’s database, which may aid them in genetically hunting down criminals. However, FamilyTree didn’t notify users that their genetic information might be used this way before giving the FBI access. And while there have been high-profile, beneficial uses for law enforcement — the apprehension in 2018 of a suspect in the Golden State Killer case, for example — it does raise issues about how this highly personal information may be shared in the future. Particularly concerning is the idea that you don’t even have to share your own DNA data for it to become searchable because your third cousin has already uploaded their own profile. It’s your data, you should be able to do with it what you want. Barry Starr The technology to perform this task has improved dramatically over the last two decades, driving the costs of DNA sequencing down from $10,000 in 2011 to $1,000 in 2017, according to the US National Human Genome Research Institute. Those advances have trickled through to the commercial sector, allowing a myriad of companies, from startups to huge public organizations, to develop their own at-home DNA testing kits.Kits provide customers with an estimation of their genetic histories, ancestries and even potential health issues they might run into. But going from a saliva sample to a genetic history solution is a complex process involving overwhelming amounts of data and statistical analyses that often confound more than they clarify. “There is a general lack of knowledge about how the whole process of ancestry testing works,” Curtis says. “People’s perceptions of the results might be different from the way a genetic scientist might interpret the results.”I’m pretty well versed in the complexities of molecular biology, but after sending my spittle away I become acutely aware that I have no idea how AncestryDNA’s test works. I know it’ll give me an “ethnicity estimate” and tell me my “DNA story,” but beyond the marketing buzzwords I’m in the dark.Science, math and dataAncestryDNA uses a database that contains more than 16,000 reference DNA samples from 43 regions around the world. About 12,000 of these samples come from Ancestry users who opt in and allow the company to use their DNA for research purposes, while the remaining reference samples come from public databases such as the 1000 Genomes Project.”We find people with long family histories from a certain part of the world and we analyze their DNA, and their DNA becomes, by definition, 100 percent from the region” says Barry Starr, director of scientific communications at AncestryDNA. The science of it is complex: The procedure splits up a DNA sample into 1,001 different “windows,” as Starr calls them. All up, those 1,001 windows look at approximately 700,000 spots in the DNA code. When you take the test, every window is compared to the 1,001 windows in a reference sample, and that occurs for each of AncestryDNA’s 43 regions.If 500 of those windows match, say, a Canadian region, then by AncestryDNA’s definition, I am 50 percent Canadian. Sci-Tech “It really is cutting-edge science, and as the field advances we advance with it and so provide updates to consumers when we have made changes based on the progression of the science,” says Starr.CNET rates AncestryDNA as having one of the best kits available, in large part thanks to its huge database. But testing doesn’t just rely on database size — where the data comes from is also important. Almost 75 percent of AncestryDNA’s ethnic regions skew toward European descent, so detailed estimates of ethnicity from other regions is difficult to obtain at present. A study, published in Nature in 2016, suggested that the scientific inquiry into genomes was also suffering from bias.With fewer reference samples from both consumers and scientific research available in regions of Africa and Asia, accurate estimates for genetic heritage in those locations are more prone to error. “Everyone started out in Africa, and a small set of them moved out of Africa and colonized the world,” explains Starr. “The genetic diversity within Africa is huge compared to the rest of the world, which means you need larger reference panels.”And the results of different genealogy tests may show marked differences. For instance, 23AndMe, a rival genealogy company based in California, has a more extensive catalogue of East Asian regions than AncestryDNA. Providing DNA samples to both companies could lead to completely different ethnicity estimates. It’s not that your DNA has changed — but the different databases and algorithms used to calculate it have. ancestrydnakit-3crop Ian Knighton/CNET My DNA storyI’m not exactly sure where I come from.An educated guess would say this impressively pale skin hails from a region localized entirely within Britain. There could be some Scottish in there. Maybe a hint of Irish, too. I don’t think there’s lots of room for suspense or intrigue here.Four weeks after I spat in a tube, my email chimes. Your AncestryDNA results are in!last_img read more

Tata Motors subsidiary Jaguar Land Rover to hire 5000 staff in Britain

first_imgPhoto taken on July 6, 2016 shows the displayed Jaguar XE car at the 7th International Auto Exhibition 2016 in Xi’an, capital of northwest China’s Shaanxi Province.IANSBritain’s biggest carmaker Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) will hire 5,000 staff as it boosts its skills in autonomous and electric technology, a welcome business endorsement as Prime Minister Theresa May starts Brexit talks after a botched election.JLR, which employs more than 40,000 people globally, said it would hire 1,000 electronic and software engineers as well as 4,000 additional personnel including in manufacturing, most of whom will be based in Britain.The recruitment process will take place over the next 12 months, during Britain’s talks to leave the European Union, which carmakers have warned must result in a deal which retains free and unfettered trade to protect jobs.May lost her parliamentary majority in the June 8 general election that her Conservatives fought on the promise of a clean break with the EU single market and customs union.The renewed political uncertainty has seen business confidence tumble in recent days, according to surveys and business groups.Hours before the talks were due to begin in Brussels, the heads of the UK’s biggest business lobbies called on the government to engage “continuously” with UK business interests and strike a deal that preserves the benefits of EU membership including tariff-free trade, guarantees for EU citizens living in the UK and minimal customs formalities.Finance minister Philip Hammond said leaving the EU without an agreement would be a “very, very bad outcome for Britain” and he wanted an exit that would support employment and investment.”When I talk about a Brexit that supports British jobs, British investment and British business I mean a Brexit that avoids those cliff edges,” Hammond said in an interview with BBC television on Sunday.JLR, which is owned by India’s Tata Motors, will build its first electric vehicle, the I-PACE, in Austria but has said it wants to build such models in Britain if conditions such as support from government and academia are met.Automakers are racing to produce greener cars and improve charge times in a bid to meet rising customer demand and fulfil air quality targets but Britain lacks sufficient manufacturing capacity, an area ministers have said they want to build up.JLR, which builds just under a third of Britain’s 1.7 million cars, has said half of all its new models will be available in an electric version by the end of the decade, requiring new skills among its staff.last_img read more

African Americans Named to Head Three Morehouse Medical School Departments

first_imgThe Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in Atlanta.The Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in Atlanta recently appointed three African American faculty members to department chairs related to their field of study, effective July 1.Dr. Janice Herbert-Carter, an associate professor at the school, was appointed chairperson of the department of medical education at MSM. In her new role, she is charged with working to advance the department’s academic courses as well as expanding interdisciplinary education in the M.D. program by collaborating with other MSM educational initiatives.According to a MSM press release, Herbert-Carter will continue her roles as the associate professor of medical education and also an associate professor of family medicine.  She is a graduate of Princeton University in biochemistry and Afro-American Studies. Herbert-Carter earned her medical degree from Howard University College of medicine, where she also completed her internship and residency in internal medicine.Dr. Winston E. Thompson was named chairperson of MSM’s department of physiology. In his role, according to the press release, he will be the spokesperson for the department faculty, staff, and students.  Thompson received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Lafayette College in Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in cell and developmental biology from Rutgers University.The Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in AtlantaDr. Yasmin Tyler-Hill will serve as chairperson of the department of pediatrics. Tyler-Hill is responsible for advocating MSM’s mission to increase the number of primary pediatricians in Georgia through expansion of the community residency program. She is also charged with collaborating and seeking partners to build the department of developmental and behavioral pediatrics and enhance programs in community and general pediatrics, adolescent medicine, and the care and transition of care of children with hemoglobinopathies.Tyler-Hill graduated from Princeton University with a degree in biology. She went on to receive her medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina and completed her internship and residency at Boston City Hospital, now Boston University Medical Center.She joined MSM faculty as the assistant professor of clinical pediatrics in 2001 and later stepped into the associate professor position in 2009.last_img read more

Distant quasar spectrum reveals no sign of changes in mass ratio of

first_img © 2015 Phys.org A team of space researchers working with data from the VLT in Chile has found via measuring the spectrum of a distant quasar by analyzing absorption lines in a galaxy in front of it, that there was no measurable change in the mass ratio of protons and electrons over a span of 12 billion years. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team, made up of two members from VU University in the Netherlands, and two members from Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, describe their findings and what it might mean for helping to explain dark energy. Some theories suggest that dark energy, the mysterious force that has the universe continuing to expand, might be a field that evolves over time—if so, that might mean that some of the constants we take for granted, such as gravity, the speed of light, etc., might actually evolve as well. In this new effort, the researchers sought to test that idea by looking to see if the mass of protons or electrons (both of which are considered to be fundamental constants) and the ratio that describes their mass difference, changed over the course of billions of years.To find out if that might be the case, the researchers looked to a distant quasar, one positioned behind a galaxy, relative to us. Quasars are still somewhat mysterious, described as celestial objects that emit a huge amount of energy and light—they look like stars, but some believe they actually hold black holes. The researchers found that molecular hydrogen in the galaxy absorbed some of the light from the quasar allowing them to measure the energy transitions that occurred and thus the mass ratio of protons and electrons. Since the galaxy had been previously dated to 12.4 billion years ago, the light reaching it from the quasar must be even older. Their measurements showed no deviation (with a precision of 10–6) from the current constant, suggesting that the ratio has remained constant for at least 12 billon years. And this, the researchers claim, suggests that if dark energy is evolving, it has not done so over that time span.via physicsworld.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. An X-ray image of the quasar PKS 1127-145, located about 10 billion light-years from Earth. Credit: NASA. Citation: Distant quasar spectrum reveals no sign of changes in mass ratio of proton and electron over 12 billion years (2015, February 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-02-distant-quasar-spectrum-reveals-mass.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters Explore further Physical constant is constant even in strong gravitational fields More information: Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 071301 (2015) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.071301last_img read more

Poetic delight

first_imgIndia Habitat Center’s Amaltas Hall recently witnessed a unique program combining poetry and music Kavi Ek Rang Anek.  Eminent poet Lakshmi Shankar Bajpai rendered his poetry in eleven different formats –  geet, ghazal, doha, haiku, savvaiya, kshanika, mahiya, ghanakshri, triveni, muktak  and free verse.  His poetry dealt  with contemporary subjects and everyday situations relating to life with the common man. The beauty of the language and the sensitivity of the poet’s thoughts won the audience’s hearts. Bajpai spoke of the urgent need to preserve the various forms of poetry which form India’s rich cultural heritage . Some of Bajpai’s ghazals were composed and sung by ghazal singer  Shakeel Ahmed. Ahmed’s compositions were raag based and infused a vibrancy and fresh colour into the ghazals.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The audience too joined in and sang the refrain of Khoob naare ucchale gaye, Log baton mein taale gaye. Ahmed proved his virtuosity with the heart wrenchingly beautiful Poora Parivaar, ek kamre mein which brought alive the plight of the urban middle class. Mridula Satish Tandon, president of SAKSHI who organised the show said “It is an urgent need of the times to revive an interest in India’s cultural heritage and to bring it to today’s audience in a setting and form which they can easily understand and relate with.”last_img read more

Shuddle the Ridesharing Service for Kiddos and Grandparents Raises 10 Million

first_img Listen Now Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer 2 min read Soccer practice for one kiddo. Band practice for the other. The dentist for you. The physician for your mom, who can’t drive herself.Wednesdays can feel like a finely tuned game of Jenga — which is exactly the appeal of family-focused ridesharing startup Shuddle. The San Francisco-based company, specifically designed to chauffeur children, announced today that it has raised $9.6 million in its Series A round. In total, Shuddle has raised $12 million so far.Related: Busy Parents: Meet Shuddle, the Uber for Kids“Nearly every parent struggles with getting their kid(s) from point A to point B because they often need to be in two places at once. Shuddle solves this problem,” said Steve Schlafman, Principal at RRE Ventures, the VC house that led the deal, in the statement announcing the funding raise.That may be true. But hoisting your children and grandparents into the car of a stranger is a tall ask with a lot of potential pitfalls.To address concerns, Shuddle has specifically tailored insurance for its drivers to be able to carry minors. Also, drivers have to pass a stringent verification and screening process.The startup launched in San Francisco and is currently operating within the Bay area and has 200 female drivers as part of its network. Shuddle CEO Nick Allen was a co-founder of the Uber and Lyft ridesharing competitor Sidecar.Related: Secrets to Being Both an Executive and a Momcenter_img Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. March 18, 2015last_img read more

Soon the Floor in Your House Could Be Your Next Energy Source

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. October 25, 2016 2 min read Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowcenter_img Enroll Now for Free You know how dragging your feet around on carpeting can create finger-zapping static electricity? Well, thanks to the findings of university researchers, walking around your floor might someday create electricity and help power your house.A team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison says it has developed a technique using wood pulp and chemically treated cellulose nanofibers. Apparently the treated nanofibers produce an electrical charge when they come into contact with untreated fibers.The power of friction! Really.When embedded within flooring, the nanofibers are able to produce electricity that can be harnessed to power lights or charge batteries, the university says. The research team — made up of Xudong Wang, an associate professor of materials science and engineering, and his graduate student Chunhua Yao — recently published their findings in the journal Nano Energy.Related: No Bull! This Robot Could Put Cowboys Out of Work.Perhaps the best part of their finding is the cost. Wood pulp is an inexpensive waste product of several industries, meaning that flooring that incorporates this new technique could be as affordable as conventional materials, the university says.You might get the biggest bang for your buck by installing flooring like this in high-traffic hallways and public places like malls. “We’ve been working a lot on harvesting energy from human activities. One way is to build something to put on people, and another way is to build something that has constant access to people.” Wang said in an announcement. “The ground is the most-used place.”Related: This Gizmo Literally Lets You See Through WallsWang and his team expect that the affordability of such a product could be appealing to regular Joes like me who might someday soon install flooring systems like this in my house, for about the same price as traditional flooring materials. I say, get your Electric Slide on and power up.last_img read more

G Adventures launches TailorMade tours March GNormous savings

first_imgTags: G Adventures, New Tours, Promotions << Previous PostNext Post >> Posted by G Adventures launches ‘TailorMade’ tours & March G-Normous savings TORONTO — In response to agent feedback, G Adventures has launched a new range of tours called ‘TailorMade’.Featuring 11 destinations and sample itineraries priced from $1,219 per person, the tours come on the heels of a global survey in which 84% of 450 travel agent respondents reported an increase in requests for tailor-made travel and private tours. 44% of agents stated it as being “in high demand” while 40% said demand had increased in the past year.Bruce Poon Tip, founder, G Adventures, says there has been a distinct gap in the market for tailor-made travel solutions in adventure travel, specifically in the affordable and mid-market price ranges.“The flexibility of TailorMade means travellers can combine experiential travel with customization. While we’ve recognized an opportunity in the mid-range travel market, we’ll also be able to cater to higher-end tastes in transport, meals and accommodation,” he said.The 11 launch destinations for TailorMade travel in 2019 are Botswana, Cambodia, Costa Rica, Peru, Ecuador (including Galápagos), India, Laos, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam and Zimbabwe, with two or three sample itineraries available for each as inspiration for travellers making a TailorMade request.G Adventures’ is in the process of expanding its sales team and assigning dedicated specialists who will work with travel agents and customers to design the ideal itinerary. Options will include bespoke transportation, accommodation, meals, activities, pace of travel and budget. Travellers can opt to select a sample itinerary and depart on their own date, amend a sample itinerary, or create a whole new itinerary with the help of their private travel consultant.More news:  Universal enhances popular Harry Potter vacation package with new perksTailorMade tours are available for solo travelers or groups of nearly any size, and perfect for couples, families, friends, honeymooners, teams and affinity groups who enjoy G Adventures’ style of travel, but want to create an itinerary that caters to their unique needs.In other company news, throughout the month of March, agents can share special savings with clients as part of G Adventures’ ongoing ‘G-Normous’ promotion.The sixth-annual agent incentive, which launched in January and runs through April, is poised for a record-breaking year of sales across North America. Savings are available on select Active adventures all month long.By focusing on these ‘Active’ trips, the company aims to help agents boost sales while getting the word out about its nine newest active adventures for 2019. New offerings include multisport activities in Colombia, and trekking challenges and combination tours in South Africa, Tanzania and Nepal.There are now 70 Active options across 26 countries for adrenaline-seeking travellers.Throughout March, agents can also pass along a 15% discount on select Active-style tours with the promo code 19GA015ACT03. They can also earn extra cash and prizes for bookings when registered with the G-Normous incentive in Sherpa. The North American agent incentive program offers more than $100,000 in prizes, and runs from January through April.More news:  A new low for no-frills flying: easyJet assigns backless seat to passengerThe newest Active adventures in G Adventures’ 2019 lineup include: the 11-day ‘Colombia Multisport’ tour (Bogota to Medellin, from $2,405 per person); the 17-day ‘Colombia Multisport and Lost City Trek’ (Bogota to Santa Maria, from $3,110 per person); the eight-day ‘Tanzania Active Safari’ (roundtrip from Arusha, from $2,999 per person); the 17-day ‘Hiking South Africa’ tour (Cape Town to Johannesburg, from $2,752 per person); the 15-day ‘Trekking Langtang’ tour (roundtrip from Kathmandu, from $1,699 per person); and the 12-day ‘Kilimanjaro trek: Machame Route & Zanzibar Adventure’ (Moshi to Stone Town, from $3,999 per person, air separate).For more information about G-Normous, agents are encouraged to reach out to their local G Adventures Global Purpose Specialist and tune into the G-Normous Active Webinar on March 5 at 2pm ET.For more information about TailorMade tours, go to https://www.gadventures.com/travel-styles/private-travel/.center_img Travelweek Group Monday, March 4, 2019 Sharelast_img read more