Trump Takes a Swing at Golf Magazine Industry Notes

first_img“Fake News”President Trump criticized Golf magazine on Twitter Wednesday evening, adding the infamous liberal propaganda outlet to the ranks of Vanity Fair, Time, People, and National Review among magazines who have drawn public scorn from the commander-in-chief’s social media accounts in recent months.Unfortunately for newly appointed editor-in-chief David DeNunzio and his team, the President didn’t directly name-check them when he charged their reporting as “Fake News” and “TOTALLY UNTRUE.” Trump was, of course, disputing part of a 7,000-word story by senior writer Alan Shipnuck posted Tuesday on Golf.com and appearing in this week’s Sports Illustrated — specifically, one quote: “That White House is a real dump.”On this week’s Golf.com podcast, Shipnuck tells the story behind the story, including the pushback he received from White House communications adviser Hope Hicks after it went live.“The week of the U.S. Women’s Open [in July], I heard the same story told by two or three different other sources,” Shipnuck tells SI senior writer Michael Bamberger. “This is certainly a moment that has already passed into legend at Trump Bedminster. It might be inconvenient for her boss and she might wish he didn’t say it, but it’s not a lie.” Perhaps it’s unfortunate that one line out of Shipnuck’s lengthy, insightful piece on the President’s deep relationship with the sport has been singled out to dominate the conversation, but surely the inevitable traffic surge driven by the added attention won’t hurt.Prophyts gets a thumbs-up1105 Media’s newly launched predictive ABM platform received an endorsement from advisory firm Outsell, which called the product a “true end-to-end solution for B2B marketers.”Prophyts went live in June after more than a year in development, and 1105 executive chairman Jeff Klein called it “one of the most exciting new products I’ve seen in 35 years,” and hailed its “significant potential beyond our own markets.”“In terms of funnel dynamics, more than three-quarters of the buyer’s journey is already complete before the person even reaches sales,” added Outsell VP and lead analyst Randy Guisto. “Prophyts identifies early-stage buyers and influencers well before they are on most customers’ radar, and they quickly map them to 70 ready-to-go customer segments. This saves time, money, and precious marketing resources.”AMI needs a fulfillment managerFrom the job board… American Media, Inc. seeks a full-time New York-based subscription fulfillment manager with three-to-five years experience and knowledge of both CDS Global’s fulfillment system and Alliance for Audited Media rules and procedures. This and other job openings at careers.foliomag.com.Sports IllustratedTime Inc. betting on swimsuitsSpeaking of Sports Illustrated, as Time Inc. mulls a sale of some of its brands, it continues to seek out opportunities to build out others.The company followed up last week’s runway debut of new apparel lines tied to the SI Swimsuit brand by announcing Wednesday the creation of SISE — Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Enterprises, a new division overseeing licensing and brand extensions for the 54-year-old franchise.In a release, Sports Illustrated group SVP Chris Stone called the brand’s swimsuit franchise-turned-brand a “pop culture powerhouse” and touted its “extraordinary potential to develop new licensing and business opportunities that span a variety of categories.”Time Inc. has spent at least the past year aiming to expand the SI Swimsuit franchise from a once-a-year event to a year-round brand, but it’s hardly a new tactic for the company, which was as far back in the ancient past as 2005 was pulling in $10 million a year off of secondary products like calendars and DVDs, according to then-publisher Dave Morris (The first-ever SI Swimsuit calendar came out in 1983).Silicon Valley at the Folio: ShowNew to the Folio: Show speaker lineup: Peter Elkins-Williams, strategic partnerships manager at Facebook, and Eric Kuan, webmaster relations project manager at Google.Elkins-Williams will sit for a session on publisher partnerships, while Kuan will join Time Inc.’s Jon Hawkins and TechTarget’s Jessica Levenson for the panel, “Not Ranking? SEO Strategies That Really Work.”For more on the Folio: Show or to register, click here. A trade magazine acquisition north of the borderOntario-based B2B publisher Annex Business Media has acquired IPP&T magazine and sister title Process West, a pair of bimonthly magazines serving process engineers across Canada, from owner Michael Swan.Billing itself as “Canada’s progressive magazine for processors,” IPP&T joins Annex’s stable of 65 media brands serving a vast swath of markets, including Canadian Chiropractor, Canadian Packaging, Canadian Pizza, Pulp & Paper Canada, and Manure Manager, among numerous others.last_img read more

Missy Elliott Is Ready To Get The World Dancing Again

first_img Twitter The hip-hop legend recently shared she is working on a new album dropping next year, 14 years after her last LP, ‘The Cookbook.’ What can we expect?Ana YglesiasGRAMMYs Oct 9, 2018 – 5:34 pm The GRAMMY-winning superstar Missy Elliott has been an influential powerhouse for years, making a name for herself starting with her successful debut album Supa Dupa Fly in 1997, featuring her classic jam “Sock It 2 Me.” Since then she released five more studio albums and countless hit singles and collabs, although her last LP was 2005’s The Cookbook. She has released some juicy, one-off singles and has been on some hot features over the past 13 years, but the world is ready for more Missy. Luckily, she is ready to give the world what it wants, teasing a 2019 LP in a recent social media post. What can we expect? Missy Elliott Is Ready To Get The World Dancing Again Facebook The rap pioneer recently took to Twitter to announce that she’s ready to “get y’all a**es dancing again,” hinting she’ll have new music for us in 2019. The tweet featured a clip of a new unreleased track of hers called “Cool Off,” which sounds like it will be a dancefloor-ready banger. Five days before that post, in another tweet, she touched on why it’s been so long since she’s put out an album. “For so long I was hesitant to put out music in fear no one would get it because people said music has changed & my sound been so different,” she shares. “But now I’m like hey, bump it make music that feels good to me, let me get y’all a**es dancing again.”We are ready, Missy. Ready for whatever new jams you have been cooking up. She raps on the sneak peek of “Cool Off, “Missy in this b***h/doing s**t you ain’t ever seen.” I think we’re ready to see it, but for now we will have to hope for whatever magic the hip-hop queen has been preparing for us.We hope her and longtime friend and collaborator Timbaland have been spending at least some time in the studio together so that he can add his magic, futuristic touch through producing at least a few songs on her upcoming album. The list of Elliott’s Timbaland-produced classics is nearly endless, including “Sock It 2 Me” and “The Rain (Supa Dupa Fly)” from her debut Supa Dupa Fly, “One Minute Man” and “Get Ur Freak On” from Miss E…So Addictive and “Work It” and “Gossip Folks” from Under Construction. It is hard to deny how amazing and dynamic the music they put out together is, with his forward thinking production bringing her sound to the next level every time.Timbaland was the lead producer on all of her studio albums other than her sixth, which he played a smaller role on, and they were working on her seventh album set to release in 2008, along with Pharrell and others on production, until, after delays, the album was never released. Pharrell and Elliott eventually released two singles in 2012 “9th Inning” and “Triple Threat,” both of which featured classic slow-jam/future-sound Timbaland beats along with his vocals.Two years later, in 2015, Elliott teamed up with Pharrell to release the viral hit “WTF (Where They From),” a booty-bouncing, highly danceable track featuring the producer’s catchy, joyful beats, as well as some verses from him as well. We can only hope and pray Elliott’s latest studio sessions have and will include both GRAMMY-winning mastermind producers to keep lifting her amazing flow and bold presence to the next level with joyous, future-ready beats.Elliott has always confidently pushed the envelope and set the tone for what it means to be a female hip-hop artist in the male-dominated industry. There is no doubt that she will keep bringing her unique brand of sexy, empowered, independent female to the table in her new music. This year she has already given us a taste of that on the remix of Ciara’s girl power track “Level Up.” The two celebrate their greatness as women, recognizing they won’t settle for less than they deserve, with Elliott confidently rapping, “Original, no klepto’/ Got a new flow, got a new glow./Level up, I’m beautiful/My a**, bounce like a yo-yo.”The remix of the GRAMMY-winning R&B star’s recent single reunites the pair, along with Fatman Scoop, the three of whom collabed on “Lose Control,” the biggest—and still classic dance-inducing jam—single from Elliott’s The Cookbook. Elliott is also featured on “borderline,” a bouncy, shiny Pharrell-produced song on Ariana Grande’s Sweetener, released this August.We can only hope these recent features point to some heavy doses of female-empowerment, along with some unexpected yet heavy-hitting, female-dominated collabs on Elliott’s 2019 album. The cherry on top that would tie it all together would have to be provided by Timbaland and Pharrell’s powerhouse production skills. We will wait patiently and practice our dance moves until then.Madonna Is Working Hard On New Album: “These Dark Circles Are For All My Fans”Read more https://twitter.com/MissyElliott/status/1048779346369032192 News Email Missy Elliott Will Get The World Dancing in 2019 missy-elliott-ready-get-world-dancing-againlast_img read more

What AncestryDNA taught me about DNA privacy and the complex world of

first_img Share your voice Tags The hardest thing about having your DNA sequenced is generating a teaspoon’s worth of spit.They don’t tell you this in the marketing materials for your typical at-home DNA test kit, but producing enough saliva to fill a pen-sized tube up to its high spit mark is hard work — and strangely nerve-wracking, too.I sneak into an unused meeting room, chewing on air to generate slobber. The kit has two tubes. One, now full of my spit, and a second smaller tube with a chemical mix that stabilizes DNA. After uniting the two tubes, I stick the pale blue spit-mix into a box and mail it off to AncestryDNA, the genetics arm of the world’s largest genealogy company, Ancestry.In 2012 Ancestry launched the AncestryDNA service, which provides paying users the ability to build a timeline of their genes, search for relatives and understand what geographic regions their DNA originates from. Ancestry has sold 14 million kits since launch, and the number continues to grow as curious consumers turn to DNA to unravel their histories. The AncestryDNA kit Chris Linton So it’s not just me caught up in this craze — search for “Ancestry DNA results” on YouTube and you’ll find an entire subculture propped up by enthusiastic explorers probing their genetic histories. There’s a whole genre of evening TV dedicated to analyzing the family histories of the rich and famous. Over the last two years many DNA kit manufacturers have begun marketing their products as “perfect gifts.” In the 2018 Thanksgiving period, AncestryDNA broke its November sales record. Your DNA story has become this year’s hottest Christmas gift! Consumer genealogy tests have become big business practically overnight. Why are we so interested in finding out the secrets of our DNA?”I think the major appeal of DNA testing is to find out something new about us,” says Caitlin Curtis, a population geneticist at the University of Queensland. That’s certainly true for me, at least. My first thought is what revelations my spit might teach me about myself. But in the quest for answers, do we truly understand what kind of information we’re giving up?Related: The best DNA testing kits for 2019 Digging into your DNAThe almost unfathomable complexity of all life on Earth, from bacteria to humans, relies on DNA, but the DNA code itself is made up of just four letters: A, T, C and G.These letters, known as bases, always pair together the same way — A with T, C with G. The order in which these letters are arranged is what makes us different and gives us our unique traits. And because we hand parts of our DNA from parent to offspring, it also links us to the past. We just need to be able to “read” it and put all those bases in order. This is known as DNA sequencing. In the future, not even your DNA will be sacred Genealogy site credited with helping ID Golden State Killer suspect Best DNA Ancestry Testing Kits Now playing: Watch this: The genealogy craze 8 7:06 DNA data storage could solve a big problem Comments Who does that data belong to? It can be confusing, especially when these companies make deals with huge corporations to share their data.”I believe that there is an ethical obligation for these companies to be very upfront, honest and explain in simple terms to people what might happen to their data after they take a test, but that is not always the case,” says Curtis.AncestryDNA’s terms and conditions state that it “does not claim any ownership rights in the DNA submitted for testing” but by submitting a sample you effectively “grant AncestryDNA … a royalty-free, worldwide, sublicensable, transferable license to host, transfer, process, analyze, distribute, and communicate your Genetic Information for the purposes of providing you products and services.”It may be my DNA, but how it’s used in the future is something that AncestryDNA decides. However, there is a failsafe. The nuke-it-all option.”It’s your data, you should be able to do with it what you want,” Starr says. “If you decide at some point that you don’t want us to have it anymore, you can tell us to delete it and you can even tell us to destroy the DNA sample.”DNA as data”The biggest danger with handing control of your DNA data is the potential for discrimination based on that information,” says Curtis.Now that even our DNA is being digitized and stored in the infinite online filing cabinet of the World Wide Web, we must confront a reality in which our own genetic makeup can be hacked, stolen or used against us.”There are some parallels to broader conversations around how to govern our personal digital data online – and the possibility for it to be used in unanticipated ways in the future,” she continues.When we began signing up, en masse, for social media services such as Facebook and Twitter over a decade ago, we blindly shared our best baby photos and snarkiest thoughts with reckless abandon. Little did we know our personal data was being siphoned off insidiously and then used to target us in ad campaigns. And that data is still being generated and used today — Facebook gets to know exactly who we are in a matter of months. A cautionary tale, it would seem, considering genealogy testing has undergone rapid growth in the last two years. And though the science is getting better, the regulations and potential pitfalls are becoming harder to nail down.”It’s a complicated issue because in some countries there is protection against discrimination, and in some countries there are very few laws about what you can do with genetic data,” explains Curtis. In the US, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 prevents health insurers and employers from discriminating against you based on your genetic profile. However, in Australia, insurance companies can discriminate based on the results of a DNA test, increasing premiums or completely excluding coverage for certain diseases.Cool. Cool cool cool. Almost none of this research was done before I spat into a tube six or seven weeks ago, and now I realize my nerves weren’t about how much spittle I could produce. I jangled because I was diving headfirst into a world I thought I understood, but actually knew hardly anything about. There were voices gnawing at my subconscious. A devil on one shoulder, an angel on the other. One quietly trying to tell me that it’s kind of weird to give a private, multinational company access to the immutable information that can be used to identify me — and only me. The other saying “what can you lose?”You already know which one I listened to. I click through ready to solve this admittedly feeble personal mystery. But there are no shocking revelations. I end up with an ethnicity estimate that puts my DNA origins at 55 percent England, Wales and Northwestern Europe and 44 percent Ireland and Scotland.However, there’s also a zero to 1 percent chance my DNA comes from a region in West Africa that AncestryDNA pegs as relating to “Benin/Togo.” Surprising to me, but not unusual, according to Starr.”A 0-1 percent would say there might be something interesting here, but there might not,” he says. A result such as this might “fall out” in the future, as AncestryDNA’s databases continue to be refined by additional samples and research programs. My ethnicity estimate is only one half of the picture, however, because I can also look at my DNA matches, which directly correlates my DNA with that of other users in Ancestry’s database. In my case, it throws up two matches that AncestryDNA classes as “second cousins” — pretty close relatives of mine, according to my genes.I’ve never seen these people.And this is a caveat for the AncestryDNA kit. Your DNA might kick up matches with people you’ve never seen before, but if you want to fit them into your family tree, you need to subscribe to the other side of the Ancestry business to pore over how you might, potentially, be related to one another.  dnastoryMy ethnicity estimate had me at a 0 to 1 percent chance of having genetic heritage in Benin/Togo Jackson Ryan Digital DNA trailIn January, Buzzfeed News reported that FamilyTreeDNA, another huge provider of at-home DNA kits, had given the FBI access to its database of over a million profiles. The company provides the FBI with the ability to upload genetic profiles from crime scenes to FamilyTree’s database, which may aid them in genetically hunting down criminals. However, FamilyTree didn’t notify users that their genetic information might be used this way before giving the FBI access. And while there have been high-profile, beneficial uses for law enforcement — the apprehension in 2018 of a suspect in the Golden State Killer case, for example — it does raise issues about how this highly personal information may be shared in the future. Particularly concerning is the idea that you don’t even have to share your own DNA data for it to become searchable because your third cousin has already uploaded their own profile. It’s your data, you should be able to do with it what you want. Barry Starr The technology to perform this task has improved dramatically over the last two decades, driving the costs of DNA sequencing down from $10,000 in 2011 to $1,000 in 2017, according to the US National Human Genome Research Institute. Those advances have trickled through to the commercial sector, allowing a myriad of companies, from startups to huge public organizations, to develop their own at-home DNA testing kits.Kits provide customers with an estimation of their genetic histories, ancestries and even potential health issues they might run into. But going from a saliva sample to a genetic history solution is a complex process involving overwhelming amounts of data and statistical analyses that often confound more than they clarify. “There is a general lack of knowledge about how the whole process of ancestry testing works,” Curtis says. “People’s perceptions of the results might be different from the way a genetic scientist might interpret the results.”I’m pretty well versed in the complexities of molecular biology, but after sending my spittle away I become acutely aware that I have no idea how AncestryDNA’s test works. I know it’ll give me an “ethnicity estimate” and tell me my “DNA story,” but beyond the marketing buzzwords I’m in the dark.Science, math and dataAncestryDNA uses a database that contains more than 16,000 reference DNA samples from 43 regions around the world. About 12,000 of these samples come from Ancestry users who opt in and allow the company to use their DNA for research purposes, while the remaining reference samples come from public databases such as the 1000 Genomes Project.”We find people with long family histories from a certain part of the world and we analyze their DNA, and their DNA becomes, by definition, 100 percent from the region” says Barry Starr, director of scientific communications at AncestryDNA. The science of it is complex: The procedure splits up a DNA sample into 1,001 different “windows,” as Starr calls them. All up, those 1,001 windows look at approximately 700,000 spots in the DNA code. When you take the test, every window is compared to the 1,001 windows in a reference sample, and that occurs for each of AncestryDNA’s 43 regions.If 500 of those windows match, say, a Canadian region, then by AncestryDNA’s definition, I am 50 percent Canadian. Sci-Tech “It really is cutting-edge science, and as the field advances we advance with it and so provide updates to consumers when we have made changes based on the progression of the science,” says Starr.CNET rates AncestryDNA as having one of the best kits available, in large part thanks to its huge database. But testing doesn’t just rely on database size — where the data comes from is also important. Almost 75 percent of AncestryDNA’s ethnic regions skew toward European descent, so detailed estimates of ethnicity from other regions is difficult to obtain at present. A study, published in Nature in 2016, suggested that the scientific inquiry into genomes was also suffering from bias.With fewer reference samples from both consumers and scientific research available in regions of Africa and Asia, accurate estimates for genetic heritage in those locations are more prone to error. “Everyone started out in Africa, and a small set of them moved out of Africa and colonized the world,” explains Starr. “The genetic diversity within Africa is huge compared to the rest of the world, which means you need larger reference panels.”And the results of different genealogy tests may show marked differences. For instance, 23AndMe, a rival genealogy company based in California, has a more extensive catalogue of East Asian regions than AncestryDNA. Providing DNA samples to both companies could lead to completely different ethnicity estimates. It’s not that your DNA has changed — but the different databases and algorithms used to calculate it have. ancestrydnakit-3crop Ian Knighton/CNET My DNA storyI’m not exactly sure where I come from.An educated guess would say this impressively pale skin hails from a region localized entirely within Britain. There could be some Scottish in there. Maybe a hint of Irish, too. I don’t think there’s lots of room for suspense or intrigue here.Four weeks after I spat in a tube, my email chimes. Your AncestryDNA results are in!last_img read more

Trumps family joins him in White House

first_imgUS President Donald Trump ©, first lady Melania Trump, and their son Barron Trump, using a fidget spinner, walk off Air Force One after arriving at Andrews Airforce base, Maryland. Photo: AFPAs of Sunday night, the White House has two new occupants: US First Lady Melania Trump and her son Barron have finally moved in to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.Six months after President Donald Trump arrived, the Slovenia-born former model and the couple’s 11-year-old son joined him, an aide to the First Lady told AFP.The pair had previously stayed in New York so that Barron could complete the school year. He is expected to attend St. Andrews Episcopal school, just outside Washington, in the 2017-2018 session.Before reaching the capital Melania and Barron descended the steps of Air Force One alongside President Trump at Joint Base Andrews, with the youngster—decked in a tee-shirt that read ‘The Expert’—playing with a fidget spinner.Melania’s parents had joined them for the short flight from Bedminster, New Jersey, where Trump had spent the weekend at his golf course.After arriving at the White House Melania tweeted a picture from a window looking on to the South Lawn and the Washington Monument.“Looking forward to the memories we’ll make in our new home! #Movingday” she wrote.Melania is the first First Lady in modern history to delay her arrival in Washington after an election win.During the week at least, Trump had been living alone in the vast, private quarters of the White House as he fends off the flood of reporting over Russia having allegedly meddled in the 2016 US election with the aim of helping him defeat Hillary Clinton.The first lady has mostly kept a low profile since her real estate mogul husband became president.Arguably, her biggest public outing came last month when she and Trump visited the Middle East and Europe on a trip that the White House later praised as a resounding success.last_img read more