With trick penalty, Barcelona rout Celta

first_imgMADRID (AP):Lionel Messi put on another show at the Camp Nou yesterday, scoring a remarkable goal from a free kick and then helping to set up a hat-trick for Luis Su·rez – including a daring assist from a penalty kick – as Barcelona thrashed Celta Vigo 6-1.Ivan Rakitic and Neymar also scored as Barcelona opened up a three-point lead in the Spanish league over AtlÈtico Madrid, which edged Getafe 1-0. Real Madrid, which beat Athletic Bilbao 4-2 on Saturday with two goals by Cristiano Ronaldo, are four points behind Barcelona in third place. Barcelona have a game in hand.It was an impressive victory by the Catalan club, and the performances by Messi, Suarez and Neymar in the second half neared perfection.”We were spectacular and effective,” Barcelona coach Luis Enrique said. “I’m used to seeing these players. When they train, they are even better.”Messi started the show by curling a left-foot shot over the wall in the 28th minute and then mesmerised the Camp Nou crowd as he helped Su·rez to score in the 59th, 75th, and 81st minutes.EXTRA-SPECIAL GOALSu·rez ‘s third goal was extra special, with the Uruguay striker and Messi fooling everybody after Messi was tripped in the area following a nifty dribble past a defender. Messi was set to take the spot-kick himself, but he just rolled the ball to the side for the in-rushing Su·rez to drive it home.While Celta players looked on in awe, Su·rez and Messi glimpsed at each other and smiled broadly before embracing to celebrate. Luis Enrique tried to cover his mouth while smiling himself at the bench.”Barcelona players, in addition to winning titles, also want to have fun and entertain the members in a fair and spectacular way,” the coach said. “It didn’t surprise me.”The play became famous after Johan Cruyff – a Barcelona idol – executed it while playing for Ajax in 1982.”It’s a legal play. Some will like it, some won’t,” Luis Enrique said. “It will generate a lot of debate.”last_img read more

COURTS NOTICE: MOTIONS COURT POSTPONED UNTIL TUESDAY

first_imgCHANGE OF DATES: COURTS SERVICETHE Motions Court scheduled for tomorrow, Monday 9th March will be held on Tuesday 10th March instead in Letterkenny Courthouse. COURTS NOTICE: MOTIONS COURT POSTPONED UNTIL TUESDAY was last modified: March 8th, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:letterkennymotions courtlast_img

Trees Communicate with Aspirin

first_imgTrees talk to each other in a chemical language (02/21/2006), but till now, no one realized they sound an alarm with aspirin.  Trees emit a vaporous form of aspirin when under stress, reported Science Daily, that talks on the ecological network.  This was an unexpected finding.    Scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research theorized that the methyl salicylate vapor, one of hundreds of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by plants, is a distress signal.  It may put the plant or tree into a kind of high-alert mode, stimulating immune responses, and it may also signal neighboring plants to be on guard against a climactic or invasive threat.    Scientists knew that methyl salicylate was produced by plants, but did not realize till now that plants emit significant quantities of it into the atmosphere, and use it for signaling.  The team detected the aspirin when studying VOCs in a California walnut grove.  “These findings show tangible proof that plant-to-plant communication occurs on the ecosystem level,” a co-author of the study said.  “It appears that plants have the ability to communicate through the atmosphere.”    If farmers can learn to read the chemical signals in vapors emitted by plants, they may gain a new way to quickly gauge the health of their crops before damage becomes visible.The article did not mention evolution.  Here is another amazing fact, right under biologists’ noses, that was unknown till now.  If an observable, measurable phenomenon in the present can escape detection for so long, how can biologists speak so glibly about factors in mythical worlds millions of years ago?  How could a communication network among brainless plants evolve?  This was discovered by good old-fashioned field work.  Taxpayers donated funds for the research.  Darwin donated nothing.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

How Balanced Ventilation Systems Become Exhaust-Only

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Unlike the homes of our great-grandparents, the homes of most Americans are served by an array of automatic appliances and systems.When our great-grandparents returned home after a three-day absence, they would need to haul a bucket of water from the spring and light a fire in the kitchen stove before they could brew tea. Today’s homes, of course, have electricity for lighting, a furnace for warmth, an air conditioner for cooling, a water heater for showers, and internet access for Googling.If one of our modern services is interrupted, residents usually notice within a few hours. Teenagers are often the first to sense that something has conked out. “Dad, there’s no hot water,” they shout, or “Mom! The internet is down!” When the furnace shuts down in January or the air conditioner breaks in July, it doesn’t take long for someone to figure out that something is wrong.We love our comforts, so most of our appliances are coddled and cared for when they get sick. Yet no one notices the poor HRV in the basement, even when it’s broken. (Remember the children’s classic, Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel? Someone should write a children’s story titled Amy, the Aging HRV. The main character would surely be sad, neglected, and lonely.)The last time I discussed neglected HRVs was in a 2012 blog called Broken Ventilation Equipment Goes Unnoticed for Years. My article was inspired by an e-mail from Joe Nagan, an energy consultant from Wisconsin who is known for his sense of humor. Like other consultants who make site visits, Nagan has a good collection of stories from the field. This week, his latest HRV tale landed in my In box.The setting for Nagan’s story is a handsome older house in Door… center_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

Race for long-range IoT network finds early leaders

first_img Log in to Reply Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: IoT Continue Reading Previous IBASE: Mini-ITX motherboard powered by 9th/8th gen Intel processorsNext EKF: CompactPCI Serial to CompactPCI Classic bridge CameronRobertson says: 1 thought on “Race for long-range IoT network finds early leaders” July 22, 2019 at 9:11 am Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must Register or Login to post a comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. “Manufacturers are not sitting around when it comes to advances in the tech sector including network storage. They would grab any given opportunity and strike the iron while it is still hot. This is because changes in the tech sector can occur in the blink SAN JOSE, Calif. — LoRa and cellular’s Narrowband-IoT (NB-IoT) are far ahead of a pack of low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs) staking out early design wins in the internet of things. The LTE-M version of 4G cellular is a distant third, and Sigfox trails, according to a new report from IHS Markit.The report suggests that a once wide-open field is beginning to narrow significantly. However, it’s still early days. IHS estimated that just 150 million LPWAN links were deployed in 2018, a figure that it expects to expand at a 63% compound annual growth rate to hit 1.7 billion links by 2023.It’s also worth noting that some alternatives are just emerging from the lab. For example, multiple vendors are shipping their first chips this year for a 900-MHz version of Wi-Fi called HaLow that’s expected to hold significant promise for long-range connections. And last year, research institute CEA-Leti announced early work on a new option based on a patented Turbo-FSK waveform.That said, IHS forecasts that NB-IoT and LoRa could claim 86% of all LPWAN links in 2023. “We think it is a two-horse race by 2023, with LoRaWAN more in private and NB-IoT mainly in public networks,” said Christian Kim, one of the authors of the report.Interestingly, Huawei’s HiSilicon division is the leading supplier of today’s NB-IoT chips, 90% of which are deployed in China. Taiwan’s Mediatek is second, and China’s RDA Unisoc is third in NB-IoT silicon. NB-IoT had its origins in technology from U.K. startup Neul, acquired by Huawei in 2014.The relatively sluggish market for LTE-M chips is led by Qualcomm, followed by Sequans and Altair. Semtech is by far the dominant supplier of LoRa chips, the current market leader among LPWANs.Overall, 54% of last year’s LPWAN deployments were in China versus about 23% each in the Americas and the EMEA region. Government-backed smart-city projects in China are driving NB-IoT today with deployments in smart meters, parking meters, and streetlights.“Most projects are using government money,” said Kim. “A lot of enterprises have not warmed to NB-IoT, even in China.”To some extent, the LPWANs are solutions seeking problems. IHS currently tracks 20 use cases proposed for the links.The China government is promoting use of NB-IoT in smart homes for electronic locks, smoke detectors, and other uses, and Huawei has talked about its use in agriculture for more efficient dairy farms. However, it has not yet taken hold in such applications to date, Kim said.In the U.S., Wi-Fi and Bluetooth by far dominate in the smart home. And in developed countries, dairy farms are already operating at high efficiency levels, he added. LoRa and NB-IoT could command 86% of all LPWA deployments by 2023. Click to enlarge. (Source: IHS Markit) last_img read more

Thank You To Touch Football Volunteers

first_imgNVW is the largest celebration of volunteers and volunteerism in Australia, and provides an opportunity to highlight the role of volunteers in our communities and to say thank you to the more than six million Australians who volunteer across the country. The 2012 National Volunteer Week runs from Monday, 14 May to Sunday, 20 May 2012 and the theme for this year is ‘Volunteers – Every One Counts.’Touch Football has volunteers at many levels of the sport, from affiliate administrators through to referees, coaches, selectors and panel/executive members and the sport wouldn’t be as successful as it is without the help of these valued volunteers. TFA Chief Executive Officer, Colm Maguire, has praised the efforts of the volunteers involved in the sport of Touch Football, saying that their hard work is greatly appreciated. “Volunteers are a valuable and integral part of any sporting association and on behalf of Touch Football Australia I thank each and every one for their contribution,” Maguire said. Touch Football Australia would like to thank all of its volunteers for their contribution to our sport.last_img read more

a day ago​Dele Alli insists Spurs players behind Pochettino

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say ​Dele Alli insists Spurs players behind Pochettinoby Freddie Taylora day agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham star Dele Alli believes that everyone at the club is firmly behind their manager Mauricio Pochettino.Spurs are struggling for confidence and form, especially in the Premier League.It has seen them slip in the top four race and prompted talks about Pochettino’s future at the club. But Alli insists every one of Spurs’ players is behind the Argentine coach.He told reporters: “Yeah, 1,000 per cent [players are behind Pochettino].”A lot of us would not be where we are now if it was not for him. All we can do is thank him.”We have always trusted him 100 per cent and we are going to keep doing that. We are a team.”When things are not going our way, it is easy for people to try and get at the manager but we need to look at ourselves as players.”We’re doing that and we are going to keep working hard.” last_img read more

One Last Dispatch From The Land Of Chess Kings And Billionaires

Left: While waiting for the title ceremony, Magnus Carlsen is finally able to relax with his father by his side. Right: Following his defeat, Karjakin was clearly disappointed while speaking to the Russian media. He confirmed rumors about travelling to New York with a Virgin Mary icon. Watching an elite chess match in person is at once enjoyable and discomfiting. You follow the players’ actions — their moves, their mannerisms — for long stretches of time. You hang on each one and imbue it with meaning. You become so familiar with their moves that you can rattle them off later from memory: “queen to h6,” say, or “rook to e2.” You try to understand why the players did what they did. The moves can be beautiful or inscrutable or frustrating or disappointing. You try to imagine what you would do if you were in one of their chairs. You try to predict what they will do next. You try and make sense of their postgame explanations. But you aren’t them, and you can never really understand.On Wednesday, the final day of the World Chess Championship, hundreds crowded into the Fulton Market Building in lower Manhattan to watch, trying to understand. Magnus Carlsen, the defending champion, No. 1-rated player in the world and the closest thing the sport has to a rock star, was facing his challenger, Sergey Karjakin of Russia, in a series of speedy tiebreaker games. The 12 lengthy games that had stretched over the previous 19 days — I attended 11 in person — ended tied and the two grandmasters were back in their chairs in a soundproof glass box to break the deadlock. It was the biggest day in chess in many years. Carlsen, the former wunderkind, was clinging to his title and his legacy, while Karjakin and the Russians were hoping for a return to the days of Soviet chess hegemony. On the fourth game of the tiebreaker, and the 16th of the match, Carlsen attacked the Russian’s king, Karjakin resigned and the two shook hands. It was over. You had to elbow your way through knots of onlookers to get anywhere in the venue’s sprawling VIP wing. Men in suits and expensive shoes crowded around TVs, watching the games and sipping martinis. The room was at a low murmur — equal parts English and Russian with an occasional dash of Norwegian. The clinking of glasses and the ratatat of ice in cocktail shakers punctuated the chess talk.Like a Russian nesting doll, a VVIP section had been set up for Peter Thiel, the Silicon Valley billionaire, and company within the VIP section. It was newly roped off and closely monitored by scary-looking bodyguards. Thiel, a Donald Trump supporter and a strong chess player himself, and Yuri Milner, the Russian billionaire venture capitalist, sat at a board inside. With apologies to Beyoncé, it was $6 billion at a chess table. Accompanying them: Bennett Miller, who directed “Foxcatcher,” about the wrestling-obsessed murderer and multimillionaire heir to the du Pont fortune, and the Icelandic grandmaster Hedinn Steingrimsson, who was giving them a private analysis of the ongoing championship game taking place just a few yards away.A buffet and wine bar had been installed for the guests from Silicon Valley who’d arrived that day, and bored-looking members of their entourages lolled on large couches, poking at iPhones. Word around the venue was that the billionaires had paid $50,000 for these privileges. (The match’s organizer wouldn’t comment on the figure.) Much later in the evening, some other journalists and I raided their buffet, eating what must have been thousands of dollars worth of cold mini tacos.“Are you security?” the writer Brin-Jonathan Butler asked one of the well-dressed, well-built men keeping close watch over the well-heeled chess lesson.“Something like that,” he responded ominously. “I wouldn’t bother them, if you don’t mind.”This World Chess Championship scene was somewhere at the intersection of Bond film, Trump fundraiser and museum gala. There are other internal chess-world squabbles. Agon Limited, the match’s organizer, filed an application for a restraining order and injunction against a number of popular third-party chess websites, just before the match began. The websites’ alleged transgression? Relaying chess moves live, which Agon saw as a violation. The application was denied by a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, who wrote that “robust reporting of factual data concerning the contestants’ moves” best served the public interest. Agon’s CEO, Ilya Merenzon, told me that the company would continue to pursue the matter in court, and was also proposing legislation to cement their rights to the games they organize.I discussed the case with Macauley Peterson, the content director for chess24, one of the defendants, on the floor of the venue during one of the early games. He kept glancing away from me at people walking by. He said he was worried about who might be eavesdropping.The tournament’s organizers have declared their own victory, though, bragging that the 20-day biennial championship had drawn some 10,000 spectators to its location in the South Street Seaport. But that’s less than, say, half the average attendance of the worst team in baseball for any one of its 81 home games this year. And the event’s only two main sponsors were PhosAgro, a Russian producer of phosphate-based fertilizer, and EG Capital Advisors, a Russian investment management company. Not exactly Nike and Coca-Cola. Spectators in the VIP lounge. A production team from Russia created an atmosphere for VIPs more often seen in Moscow than Manhattan. Despite the high-powered, moneyed interest, and its prime New York City location, the match was sparsely covered by the American press — as chess is generally — and given little attention outside the core chess world. It’s unlikely to increase the game’s reach or exposure as the organizers may have hoped. That did happen once in the States — in 1972 — but that was because of Bobby Fischer.The troublesome shadow of Fischer stretches over every conversation of chess’s success and future in the U.S. He was the best American player of all time, and its only modern world champion. His legacy is stained by his vocal anti-Semitism, and comments that he was pleased with the terrorism on Sept. 11, among other things. But in his chess prime, he carried the U.S. on his back while sitting at the board, having taught himself the game, largely alone, in a shabby Brooklyn apartment. And he won.While this year’s championship lacked the colorful characters and Cold War narrative of Fischer’s title run — although some journalists tried to revive them — it did have some of the controversy.Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, the president of the game’s international governing body, FIDE, was absent from the match, having been sanctioned by the U.S. for business connections with the Assad regime in Syria. Ilyumzhinov is no stranger to controversy. He insists he was abducted by aliens. They were wearing yellow spacesuits and nabbed him from his Moscow apartment in 1997, taking him away to a distant star. He considers chess “a gift from extraterrestrial civilizations.” Left: Magnus Carlsen, 26, at the World Chess Championship’s opening gala at the Plaza Hotel in New York City. Right: Sergey Karjakin, 26, tests the overhead lights in the playing hall. All photographs by Misha Friedman Left: A branded vodka bar assured VIPs were sufficiently entertained throughout the tournament. Right: Ekaterina, a Karjakin family friend, flew in from Moscow just for the tiebreaker round. But despite the controversy and the finances, what’s really missing from chess is a character.The U.S. has three players in the world Top 10, any one of whom could have a shot at challenging Carlsen for the title in two years. They’re undeniably fantastic players. But they seem less like compelling national characters — and less like artists — than Fischer did. They’re technicians, raised in a computer-chess age. Carlsen ended the match and extended his world championship reign with a beautiful move on Wednesday evening — whether he’d admit its beauty or not — sacrificing his queen to entrap Karjakin’s king. But in one of the postgame press conferences, Carlsen said chess was a sport and a science. For art, he said, you’d “have to look elsewhere.” Left: Neil deGrasse Tyson, a celebrated astrophysicist, and Fabiano Caruana, the No. 2 ranked chess player in the world, chatted about baseball. Right: Peter Thiel showed up for the decisive tiebreaker round and had a grandmaster at his side to explain the games live. Tickets were expensive, but there were a lot of young fans at every game, especially on weekends. After the match — after the trophy presentation and the cake and the champagne — our photographer and I tracked down the Norwegian contingent at an after-after-party at a steakhouse a couple miles uptown. It was a festive scene. Holiday garland and lights festooned the bannisters and the restaurant was a cozy respite from the cold and rainy November day outside. Carlsen was sitting at a far table in the crowded dining room with about 50 others. He was eating. With a fork. Like a person. It was odd to see him with something other than a chess piece in his hand.I wanted to talk to him. I’d been watching him for hours most days for the past three weeks. But honestly I had no idea what I’d say. Carlsen famously hates interviews. But I was saved. “No questions. Definitely no,” his manager, Espen Agdestein, told us. “He’s very tired. We’re just relaxing.”I’m not Carlsen. But I understood. read more

Football Michigan offense starts with the run game

OSU junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis (59) takes his position during their game on Nov. 19, 2016 at Spartan Stadium. The Buckeyes won 17-16. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo EditorMichigan played its first game of the season without redshirt sophomore quarterback Wilton Speight last week, and if they proved one thing in their 20-10 victory over Indiana, it’s that its offense now relies almost solely on the shoulders of senior running back De’Veon Smith.Even if the injured Speight does return against Ohio State, Smith will still likely be considered the most crucial part of the Michigan offense.The senior running back set a career-high with 158 rushing yards in last Saturday’s victory over the Hoosiers and accounted for both of Michigan’s touchdowns.This trend is not something that has been entirely alien to their offense, however. Of the 60 touchdowns scored this season by the Maize and Blue, 39 have come on the ground while only 17 have come through the air and two have come on defensive plays. Smith is responsible for 10 of those rushing touchdowns.But this style of rushing offense is a bit different from one that the Buckeyes have faced in other games this year. The Wolverines run with a pro-style offense, meaning they rely heavily on the play of the offensive line and count on their quarterbacks being styled more to pass than to run.The play of the running backs is different than that of most other college-style offenses, but junior linebacker Chris Worley knows exactly what to expect out of the running backs.“It’s not going to be guys trying to run around you,” Worley said. “It’s going to be guys trying to run through your face.”OSU redshirt junior cornerback Gareon Conley said in this game, the defense will have to focus more on stopping Smith and the rushing offense than their air attack.“They don’t throw the ball as much because they run the ball a lot,” Conley said. “But we’ll be forced to stop the run and play the pass whenever it comes.”Facing a run-heavy offense, the Buckeyes should feel confident about their chances in slowing down Smith given how their defense has played against the run this year. OSU ranks 18th in fewest rush yards allowed per game and has only allowed four touchdowns to be scored on the ground, tied for second among FBS teams. They have also only allowed opponents to average 3.39 yards per carry, good for 18th fewest among FBS schools. For redshirt junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis, that ability to plug up the run comes down to more than just preparation, it rests on the defensive line’s mentality.“It doesn’t really matter to me, because every team has their scheme with what they’re going to do,” Lewis said. “At the end of the day, it’s about who’s going to put their hand in the dirt and just going. You can play whatever formation you want to play, we’re going to play whatever defense we have to to dominate.”In Michigan’s 14-13 loss two weeks ago to Iowa, Speight suffered a broken collarbone on his left side. Filling in for the redshirt sophomore was redshirt junior quarterback John O’Korn, a transfer from the University of Houston. O’Korn failed to deliver much as he finished the game with only seven completed passes in 16 attempts for a total of 59 yards. He was also only capable of running for 19 yards on six rush attempts.For a time, it appeared O’Korn was headed towards his second career start in a Wolverine uniform as many early reports indicated Speight was unable to play for the remainder of the regular season. However, Speight has not officially been ruled out and now rumors emerge that he could still be Saturday’s starting quarterback.The signal caller at the beginning of the season, Speight had given the Wolverines a starting quarterback with the ability to provide the team with a strong air attack. He had completed 160 of his 257 attempted passes for a 62.3 percent completion rate, thrown for 2,156 yards and had 15 touchdown passes to only four interceptions. Lewis acknowledges that while it isn’t easy to prepare when such an important position remains a question mark, the team will be prepared by Saturday to face whomever is behind center.“It could be rough depending on if one’s a runner or not,” Lewis said. “They have a really solid foundation with what they’re going to do: run the ball, throw when necessary.” read more

Ohio States Jessica Porvasnik eyes championships LPGA

Then-freshman Jessica Porvasnik holds her follow-through after a shot during fall practice in 2013 at the OSU Golf Club. Porvasnik played in the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open after being named Big Ten Player of the Year as a freshman.Credit: Courtesy of OSU athleticsAfter a summer of teeing it up with the professionals in the U.S. Women’s Open, some coaches and teammates said Jessica Porvasnik will be back with the pros soon enough.Porvasnik, a sophomore on the Ohio State women’s golf team, had quite the summer. After finishing her freshman season by being named the Big Ten Player of the Year, Big Ten individual champion and honorable mention All-American, Porvasnik went on to qualify for the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open in May.“Something that I want to do one day is definitely go play in the LPGA (Ladies Professional Golf Association) tour so it was really cool to play with some of the people I’ve always looked up to and get the experience,” Porvasnik said.Porvasnik’s coach sees Porvasnik playing on tour one day, too. Coach Therese Hession said she is excited to see a glimpse of what the future may hold for the Hinckley, Ohio, native.   “I got to see her the second round (at the U.S. Open). She just looked like she belonged,” Hession said. “I know she even made a comment to her mom saying, ‘Three years from now, this will be my job.’”Porvasnik said, though, she doesn’t plan on leaving OSU any sooner than three years.“It’s like a thought but it would never happen. My mom is the one who says ‘No, you’re getting your degree before you leave,’ so no, it would probably never happen,” she said.Senior teammate Claudia Lim also said she believes Porvasnik will play with the professionals one day.“She’ll play on the LPGA tour, for sure,” Lim said. “She has the potential and all the characteristics to be a great leader.” Now that Porvasnik is back from playing the fairways of Pinehurst Resort & Country Club in Pinehurst, N.C., at the U.S. Women’s Open, she is ready to chase a collegiate championship with her teammates. She was one of the 42 women named on the Big Ten Women’s Golfers to Watch List this season, along with teammates redshirt-sophomore Zoe-Beth Brake and sophomore Katja Pogacar. “For the team, I know our goal is to definitely do really well in the Big Ten again and individually. I had a really good year last year, so I want to improve on that this year,” Porvasnik said. Hession said she is expecting to see a great season from Porvasnik as well, and she hopes that the sophomore will take her experiences from the summer to lead her team. “This summer she got to play with the best in the world at the U.S. Open. I think she’ll draw on those experiences and now she knows more what to expect in college golf,” Hession said.Porvasnik is scheduled to start her sophomore season as a Buckeye on Monday when OSU is set to play in the Chip-N-Club Invitational in Lincoln, Neb. The tournament is scheduled to last through Tuesday. read more