Race for long-range IoT network finds early leaders

first_img Log in to Reply Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: IoT Continue Reading Previous IBASE: Mini-ITX motherboard powered by 9th/8th gen Intel processorsNext EKF: CompactPCI Serial to CompactPCI Classic bridge CameronRobertson says: 1 thought on “Race for long-range IoT network finds early leaders” July 22, 2019 at 9:11 am Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must Register or Login to post a comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. “Manufacturers are not sitting around when it comes to advances in the tech sector including network storage. They would grab any given opportunity and strike the iron while it is still hot. This is because changes in the tech sector can occur in the blink SAN JOSE, Calif. — LoRa and cellular’s Narrowband-IoT (NB-IoT) are far ahead of a pack of low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs) staking out early design wins in the internet of things. The LTE-M version of 4G cellular is a distant third, and Sigfox trails, according to a new report from IHS Markit.The report suggests that a once wide-open field is beginning to narrow significantly. However, it’s still early days. IHS estimated that just 150 million LPWAN links were deployed in 2018, a figure that it expects to expand at a 63% compound annual growth rate to hit 1.7 billion links by 2023.It’s also worth noting that some alternatives are just emerging from the lab. For example, multiple vendors are shipping their first chips this year for a 900-MHz version of Wi-Fi called HaLow that’s expected to hold significant promise for long-range connections. And last year, research institute CEA-Leti announced early work on a new option based on a patented Turbo-FSK waveform.That said, IHS forecasts that NB-IoT and LoRa could claim 86% of all LPWAN links in 2023. “We think it is a two-horse race by 2023, with LoRaWAN more in private and NB-IoT mainly in public networks,” said Christian Kim, one of the authors of the report.Interestingly, Huawei’s HiSilicon division is the leading supplier of today’s NB-IoT chips, 90% of which are deployed in China. Taiwan’s Mediatek is second, and China’s RDA Unisoc is third in NB-IoT silicon. NB-IoT had its origins in technology from U.K. startup Neul, acquired by Huawei in 2014.The relatively sluggish market for LTE-M chips is led by Qualcomm, followed by Sequans and Altair. Semtech is by far the dominant supplier of LoRa chips, the current market leader among LPWANs.Overall, 54% of last year’s LPWAN deployments were in China versus about 23% each in the Americas and the EMEA region. Government-backed smart-city projects in China are driving NB-IoT today with deployments in smart meters, parking meters, and streetlights.“Most projects are using government money,” said Kim. “A lot of enterprises have not warmed to NB-IoT, even in China.”To some extent, the LPWANs are solutions seeking problems. IHS currently tracks 20 use cases proposed for the links.The China government is promoting use of NB-IoT in smart homes for electronic locks, smoke detectors, and other uses, and Huawei has talked about its use in agriculture for more efficient dairy farms. However, it has not yet taken hold in such applications to date, Kim said.In the U.S., Wi-Fi and Bluetooth by far dominate in the smart home. And in developed countries, dairy farms are already operating at high efficiency levels, he added. LoRa and NB-IoT could command 86% of all LPWA deployments by 2023. Click to enlarge. (Source: IHS Markit) last_img read more

Thank You To Touch Football Volunteers

first_imgNVW is the largest celebration of volunteers and volunteerism in Australia, and provides an opportunity to highlight the role of volunteers in our communities and to say thank you to the more than six million Australians who volunteer across the country. The 2012 National Volunteer Week runs from Monday, 14 May to Sunday, 20 May 2012 and the theme for this year is ‘Volunteers – Every One Counts.’Touch Football has volunteers at many levels of the sport, from affiliate administrators through to referees, coaches, selectors and panel/executive members and the sport wouldn’t be as successful as it is without the help of these valued volunteers. TFA Chief Executive Officer, Colm Maguire, has praised the efforts of the volunteers involved in the sport of Touch Football, saying that their hard work is greatly appreciated. “Volunteers are a valuable and integral part of any sporting association and on behalf of Touch Football Australia I thank each and every one for their contribution,” Maguire said. Touch Football Australia would like to thank all of its volunteers for their contribution to our sport.last_img read more

a day ago​Dele Alli insists Spurs players behind Pochettino

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say ​Dele Alli insists Spurs players behind Pochettinoby Freddie Taylora day agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham star Dele Alli believes that everyone at the club is firmly behind their manager Mauricio Pochettino.Spurs are struggling for confidence and form, especially in the Premier League.It has seen them slip in the top four race and prompted talks about Pochettino’s future at the club. But Alli insists every one of Spurs’ players is behind the Argentine coach.He told reporters: “Yeah, 1,000 per cent [players are behind Pochettino].”A lot of us would not be where we are now if it was not for him. All we can do is thank him.”We have always trusted him 100 per cent and we are going to keep doing that. We are a team.”When things are not going our way, it is easy for people to try and get at the manager but we need to look at ourselves as players.”We’re doing that and we are going to keep working hard.” last_img read more

One Last Dispatch From The Land Of Chess Kings And Billionaires

Left: While waiting for the title ceremony, Magnus Carlsen is finally able to relax with his father by his side. Right: Following his defeat, Karjakin was clearly disappointed while speaking to the Russian media. He confirmed rumors about travelling to New York with a Virgin Mary icon. Watching an elite chess match in person is at once enjoyable and discomfiting. You follow the players’ actions — their moves, their mannerisms — for long stretches of time. You hang on each one and imbue it with meaning. You become so familiar with their moves that you can rattle them off later from memory: “queen to h6,” say, or “rook to e2.” You try to understand why the players did what they did. The moves can be beautiful or inscrutable or frustrating or disappointing. You try to imagine what you would do if you were in one of their chairs. You try to predict what they will do next. You try and make sense of their postgame explanations. But you aren’t them, and you can never really understand.On Wednesday, the final day of the World Chess Championship, hundreds crowded into the Fulton Market Building in lower Manhattan to watch, trying to understand. Magnus Carlsen, the defending champion, No. 1-rated player in the world and the closest thing the sport has to a rock star, was facing his challenger, Sergey Karjakin of Russia, in a series of speedy tiebreaker games. The 12 lengthy games that had stretched over the previous 19 days — I attended 11 in person — ended tied and the two grandmasters were back in their chairs in a soundproof glass box to break the deadlock. It was the biggest day in chess in many years. Carlsen, the former wunderkind, was clinging to his title and his legacy, while Karjakin and the Russians were hoping for a return to the days of Soviet chess hegemony. On the fourth game of the tiebreaker, and the 16th of the match, Carlsen attacked the Russian’s king, Karjakin resigned and the two shook hands. It was over. You had to elbow your way through knots of onlookers to get anywhere in the venue’s sprawling VIP wing. Men in suits and expensive shoes crowded around TVs, watching the games and sipping martinis. The room was at a low murmur — equal parts English and Russian with an occasional dash of Norwegian. The clinking of glasses and the ratatat of ice in cocktail shakers punctuated the chess talk.Like a Russian nesting doll, a VVIP section had been set up for Peter Thiel, the Silicon Valley billionaire, and company within the VIP section. It was newly roped off and closely monitored by scary-looking bodyguards. Thiel, a Donald Trump supporter and a strong chess player himself, and Yuri Milner, the Russian billionaire venture capitalist, sat at a board inside. With apologies to Beyoncé, it was $6 billion at a chess table. Accompanying them: Bennett Miller, who directed “Foxcatcher,” about the wrestling-obsessed murderer and multimillionaire heir to the du Pont fortune, and the Icelandic grandmaster Hedinn Steingrimsson, who was giving them a private analysis of the ongoing championship game taking place just a few yards away.A buffet and wine bar had been installed for the guests from Silicon Valley who’d arrived that day, and bored-looking members of their entourages lolled on large couches, poking at iPhones. Word around the venue was that the billionaires had paid $50,000 for these privileges. (The match’s organizer wouldn’t comment on the figure.) Much later in the evening, some other journalists and I raided their buffet, eating what must have been thousands of dollars worth of cold mini tacos.“Are you security?” the writer Brin-Jonathan Butler asked one of the well-dressed, well-built men keeping close watch over the well-heeled chess lesson.“Something like that,” he responded ominously. “I wouldn’t bother them, if you don’t mind.”This World Chess Championship scene was somewhere at the intersection of Bond film, Trump fundraiser and museum gala. There are other internal chess-world squabbles. Agon Limited, the match’s organizer, filed an application for a restraining order and injunction against a number of popular third-party chess websites, just before the match began. The websites’ alleged transgression? Relaying chess moves live, which Agon saw as a violation. The application was denied by a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, who wrote that “robust reporting of factual data concerning the contestants’ moves” best served the public interest. Agon’s CEO, Ilya Merenzon, told me that the company would continue to pursue the matter in court, and was also proposing legislation to cement their rights to the games they organize.I discussed the case with Macauley Peterson, the content director for chess24, one of the defendants, on the floor of the venue during one of the early games. He kept glancing away from me at people walking by. He said he was worried about who might be eavesdropping.The tournament’s organizers have declared their own victory, though, bragging that the 20-day biennial championship had drawn some 10,000 spectators to its location in the South Street Seaport. But that’s less than, say, half the average attendance of the worst team in baseball for any one of its 81 home games this year. And the event’s only two main sponsors were PhosAgro, a Russian producer of phosphate-based fertilizer, and EG Capital Advisors, a Russian investment management company. Not exactly Nike and Coca-Cola. Spectators in the VIP lounge. A production team from Russia created an atmosphere for VIPs more often seen in Moscow than Manhattan. Despite the high-powered, moneyed interest, and its prime New York City location, the match was sparsely covered by the American press — as chess is generally — and given little attention outside the core chess world. It’s unlikely to increase the game’s reach or exposure as the organizers may have hoped. That did happen once in the States — in 1972 — but that was because of Bobby Fischer.The troublesome shadow of Fischer stretches over every conversation of chess’s success and future in the U.S. He was the best American player of all time, and its only modern world champion. His legacy is stained by his vocal anti-Semitism, and comments that he was pleased with the terrorism on Sept. 11, among other things. But in his chess prime, he carried the U.S. on his back while sitting at the board, having taught himself the game, largely alone, in a shabby Brooklyn apartment. And he won.While this year’s championship lacked the colorful characters and Cold War narrative of Fischer’s title run — although some journalists tried to revive them — it did have some of the controversy.Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, the president of the game’s international governing body, FIDE, was absent from the match, having been sanctioned by the U.S. for business connections with the Assad regime in Syria. Ilyumzhinov is no stranger to controversy. He insists he was abducted by aliens. They were wearing yellow spacesuits and nabbed him from his Moscow apartment in 1997, taking him away to a distant star. He considers chess “a gift from extraterrestrial civilizations.” Left: Magnus Carlsen, 26, at the World Chess Championship’s opening gala at the Plaza Hotel in New York City. Right: Sergey Karjakin, 26, tests the overhead lights in the playing hall. All photographs by Misha Friedman Left: A branded vodka bar assured VIPs were sufficiently entertained throughout the tournament. Right: Ekaterina, a Karjakin family friend, flew in from Moscow just for the tiebreaker round. But despite the controversy and the finances, what’s really missing from chess is a character.The U.S. has three players in the world Top 10, any one of whom could have a shot at challenging Carlsen for the title in two years. They’re undeniably fantastic players. But they seem less like compelling national characters — and less like artists — than Fischer did. They’re technicians, raised in a computer-chess age. Carlsen ended the match and extended his world championship reign with a beautiful move on Wednesday evening — whether he’d admit its beauty or not — sacrificing his queen to entrap Karjakin’s king. But in one of the postgame press conferences, Carlsen said chess was a sport and a science. For art, he said, you’d “have to look elsewhere.” Left: Neil deGrasse Tyson, a celebrated astrophysicist, and Fabiano Caruana, the No. 2 ranked chess player in the world, chatted about baseball. Right: Peter Thiel showed up for the decisive tiebreaker round and had a grandmaster at his side to explain the games live. Tickets were expensive, but there were a lot of young fans at every game, especially on weekends. After the match — after the trophy presentation and the cake and the champagne — our photographer and I tracked down the Norwegian contingent at an after-after-party at a steakhouse a couple miles uptown. It was a festive scene. Holiday garland and lights festooned the bannisters and the restaurant was a cozy respite from the cold and rainy November day outside. Carlsen was sitting at a far table in the crowded dining room with about 50 others. He was eating. With a fork. Like a person. It was odd to see him with something other than a chess piece in his hand.I wanted to talk to him. I’d been watching him for hours most days for the past three weeks. But honestly I had no idea what I’d say. Carlsen famously hates interviews. But I was saved. “No questions. Definitely no,” his manager, Espen Agdestein, told us. “He’s very tired. We’re just relaxing.”I’m not Carlsen. But I understood. read more

Football Michigan offense starts with the run game

OSU junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis (59) takes his position during their game on Nov. 19, 2016 at Spartan Stadium. The Buckeyes won 17-16. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo EditorMichigan played its first game of the season without redshirt sophomore quarterback Wilton Speight last week, and if they proved one thing in their 20-10 victory over Indiana, it’s that its offense now relies almost solely on the shoulders of senior running back De’Veon Smith.Even if the injured Speight does return against Ohio State, Smith will still likely be considered the most crucial part of the Michigan offense.The senior running back set a career-high with 158 rushing yards in last Saturday’s victory over the Hoosiers and accounted for both of Michigan’s touchdowns.This trend is not something that has been entirely alien to their offense, however. Of the 60 touchdowns scored this season by the Maize and Blue, 39 have come on the ground while only 17 have come through the air and two have come on defensive plays. Smith is responsible for 10 of those rushing touchdowns.But this style of rushing offense is a bit different from one that the Buckeyes have faced in other games this year. The Wolverines run with a pro-style offense, meaning they rely heavily on the play of the offensive line and count on their quarterbacks being styled more to pass than to run.The play of the running backs is different than that of most other college-style offenses, but junior linebacker Chris Worley knows exactly what to expect out of the running backs.“It’s not going to be guys trying to run around you,” Worley said. “It’s going to be guys trying to run through your face.”OSU redshirt junior cornerback Gareon Conley said in this game, the defense will have to focus more on stopping Smith and the rushing offense than their air attack.“They don’t throw the ball as much because they run the ball a lot,” Conley said. “But we’ll be forced to stop the run and play the pass whenever it comes.”Facing a run-heavy offense, the Buckeyes should feel confident about their chances in slowing down Smith given how their defense has played against the run this year. OSU ranks 18th in fewest rush yards allowed per game and has only allowed four touchdowns to be scored on the ground, tied for second among FBS teams. They have also only allowed opponents to average 3.39 yards per carry, good for 18th fewest among FBS schools. For redshirt junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis, that ability to plug up the run comes down to more than just preparation, it rests on the defensive line’s mentality.“It doesn’t really matter to me, because every team has their scheme with what they’re going to do,” Lewis said. “At the end of the day, it’s about who’s going to put their hand in the dirt and just going. You can play whatever formation you want to play, we’re going to play whatever defense we have to to dominate.”In Michigan’s 14-13 loss two weeks ago to Iowa, Speight suffered a broken collarbone on his left side. Filling in for the redshirt sophomore was redshirt junior quarterback John O’Korn, a transfer from the University of Houston. O’Korn failed to deliver much as he finished the game with only seven completed passes in 16 attempts for a total of 59 yards. He was also only capable of running for 19 yards on six rush attempts.For a time, it appeared O’Korn was headed towards his second career start in a Wolverine uniform as many early reports indicated Speight was unable to play for the remainder of the regular season. However, Speight has not officially been ruled out and now rumors emerge that he could still be Saturday’s starting quarterback.The signal caller at the beginning of the season, Speight had given the Wolverines a starting quarterback with the ability to provide the team with a strong air attack. He had completed 160 of his 257 attempted passes for a 62.3 percent completion rate, thrown for 2,156 yards and had 15 touchdown passes to only four interceptions. Lewis acknowledges that while it isn’t easy to prepare when such an important position remains a question mark, the team will be prepared by Saturday to face whomever is behind center.“It could be rough depending on if one’s a runner or not,” Lewis said. “They have a really solid foundation with what they’re going to do: run the ball, throw when necessary.” read more

Ohio States Jessica Porvasnik eyes championships LPGA

Then-freshman Jessica Porvasnik holds her follow-through after a shot during fall practice in 2013 at the OSU Golf Club. Porvasnik played in the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open after being named Big Ten Player of the Year as a freshman.Credit: Courtesy of OSU athleticsAfter a summer of teeing it up with the professionals in the U.S. Women’s Open, some coaches and teammates said Jessica Porvasnik will be back with the pros soon enough.Porvasnik, a sophomore on the Ohio State women’s golf team, had quite the summer. After finishing her freshman season by being named the Big Ten Player of the Year, Big Ten individual champion and honorable mention All-American, Porvasnik went on to qualify for the 2014 U.S. Women’s Open in May.“Something that I want to do one day is definitely go play in the LPGA (Ladies Professional Golf Association) tour so it was really cool to play with some of the people I’ve always looked up to and get the experience,” Porvasnik said.Porvasnik’s coach sees Porvasnik playing on tour one day, too. Coach Therese Hession said she is excited to see a glimpse of what the future may hold for the Hinckley, Ohio, native.   “I got to see her the second round (at the U.S. Open). She just looked like she belonged,” Hession said. “I know she even made a comment to her mom saying, ‘Three years from now, this will be my job.’”Porvasnik said, though, she doesn’t plan on leaving OSU any sooner than three years.“It’s like a thought but it would never happen. My mom is the one who says ‘No, you’re getting your degree before you leave,’ so no, it would probably never happen,” she said.Senior teammate Claudia Lim also said she believes Porvasnik will play with the professionals one day.“She’ll play on the LPGA tour, for sure,” Lim said. “She has the potential and all the characteristics to be a great leader.” Now that Porvasnik is back from playing the fairways of Pinehurst Resort & Country Club in Pinehurst, N.C., at the U.S. Women’s Open, she is ready to chase a collegiate championship with her teammates. She was one of the 42 women named on the Big Ten Women’s Golfers to Watch List this season, along with teammates redshirt-sophomore Zoe-Beth Brake and sophomore Katja Pogacar. “For the team, I know our goal is to definitely do really well in the Big Ten again and individually. I had a really good year last year, so I want to improve on that this year,” Porvasnik said. Hession said she is expecting to see a great season from Porvasnik as well, and she hopes that the sophomore will take her experiences from the summer to lead her team. “This summer she got to play with the best in the world at the U.S. Open. I think she’ll draw on those experiences and now she knows more what to expect in college golf,” Hession said.Porvasnik is scheduled to start her sophomore season as a Buckeye on Monday when OSU is set to play in the Chip-N-Club Invitational in Lincoln, Neb. The tournament is scheduled to last through Tuesday. read more

Womens Basketball Linnae Harper added to USA Basketball Womens Under23 National Team

Ohio State then-redshirt junior Linnae Harper takes the ball up the court against Purdue in a Big Ten tournament semifinal game in Indianapolis. Credit: Ashley Nelson | Station ManagerThe USA Basketball Women’s Under-23 National Team added the second Buckeye to its roster when Ohio State redshirt senior guard Linnae Harper was selected as an injury replacement Saturday evening.Harper joins Ohio State senior guard Kelsey Mitchell on the team, replacing South Carolina forward A’ja Wilson who will not play due to a groin strain. Harper and Mitchell are the only two Big Ten athletes on the roster.The Ohio State duo spent the past week competing at the national team training camp along with 34 other players. Thursday afternoon, USA Basketball announced a roster of 12 players that would travel to Tokyo to take part in the Four Nations Tournament.“I’m just grateful for the opportunity,” Harper said in a press release. “This past week was great for me, being able to play with the best players and coaches in the country. I’m very excited that I have the chance to compete and represent the USA again and play in Tokyo.”This isn’t Harper’s first time playing in international competitions. Harper has earned six medals while playing for USA Basketball, including three gold medals in the 2013 FIBA Under-19 World Championship, 2012 FIBA Under-17 World Championship and 2011 FIBA Under-16 World Championship.“We are excited to welcome Linnae, and I’ve got no doubt that she will pick things up quickly,” said Under-23 coach Jeff Walz, who also coaches at Louisville.Last season for Ohio State, the 5-foot-8 guard averaged 8.4 points, five rebounds and 1.9 assists per game and was honored as the 2017 Big Ten Sixth Player of the Year.The United States will begin play against Australia Aug. 12 at 6:30 p.m. On Aug. 13 at 4:30 p.m., Harper and her team will face off against Canada before concluding with a game against Japan on Aug. 15 at 6:30 p.m. read more

Rep Heise invites residents to April coffee hours

first_img13Apr Rep. Heise invites residents to April coffee hours State Rep. Kurt Heise invites residents of the 20th House district to meet with him in Northville this month for coffee to discuss state and local issues.Rep. Heise’s coffee hours are scheduled for Friday, April 17th from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Panera Bread, located at 20140 Haggerty Road in Northville.“One of the most rewarding parts of my job is getting to meet with and hear from individuals in our community,” said Rep. Heise, R-Plymouth. “I always look forwarding to meeting with local residents and bringing their ideas and concerns back to Lansing.”No appointments are necessary for these office hours. Residents who are not able to attend are encouraged to contact Rep. Heise’s office by phone at 1-855-REPKURT, or by email at KurtHeise@house.mi.gov.### Categories: Newslast_img read more

Dealing With Internal Security Threats

first_img May 6, 2003 –shares Technology Next Article Add to Queue 4 min readcenter_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. It’s often the internal, not external, threats that pose the greatest risk to your network. Are you prepared for the worst? Dealing With Internal Security Threats Q: How easily could a nontechnical internal employee hack my company’s network?A: With all the recent press regarding the sharp rise in Internet-based external threats, is it any wonder that internal threats continue to be overlooked? Many companies today continue to focus the majority of their budgets and effort on “external” penetration and denial of service (DOS) risks. Regardless of the source, you will consistently find that internal security breaches continue to lead to external breaches by a significant majority. In fact, the risk of internal attacks is very likely to rise in the coming year due to the growth, sophistication and ease of use of hacking tools available online.For years, security professionals have commonly communicated the vulnerabilities of operating systems and network services–such as Web, e-mail, ftp and telnet–to the public in many forms. In order for would-be hackers or disgruntled employees to take advantage of these published vulnerabilities, they’d have to create application code or scripts after studying the notes of a select group of experts who originally discovered and documented the vulnerability. Taking advantage of these security holes would require a level of knowledge beyond that of many common IT administrators and the majority of nontechnical individuals. Hence, the most common threats from nontechnical internal employees have mostly been limited to a matter of improperly managed permissions, weak authentication and other administrative-level issues.Over the past year, the number of precoded exploit applications has been on the rise. The more sophisticated hackers are now writing and publishing applications that nontechnical individuals can use on UNIX or Windows PCs. These exploit applications can scan internal networks for vulnerable servers and then perform a specific exploit against the selected target.The most common type of attack used by these new applications is DOS attacks that crash production servers with little or no way to track the source of the problem. Crashing a server is a significant issue since it not only affects productivity, but can also corrupt data, causing integrity issues. The need is apparent for constant attention to security patches and fixes as well as internal auditing and/or intrusion detection systems.Internal auditing is one critical aspect of a security plan that can reduce the risk associated with these new attack tools. However, many internal-auditing projects, if they are being done at all, focus on high-level policy issues like weak passwords, directory and file permissions, and disaster-recovery procedures. Often, it is only the external audits that commonly test for the actual operating system and network service vulnerabilities being exploited by this new age of hacking tools. It is vital that the IT managers evaluating security-auditing vendors be sure that internal-auditing vendors provide a comprehensive analysis of the operating system and application vulnerabilities. Without this analysis, these new risks to business continuance and data integrity may go undetected until they directly affect the bottom line.Many managers assume that nontechnical employees do not pose a significant risk to business continuance from an information security standpoint. Unfortunately, because of the easy access to more sophisticated exploit tools, that assumption is costing business today in terms of service outages and lost revenue. Know your risks and remediation requirements by performing an internal audit before your company becomes the next victim.Michael Bruck is the founding partner of BAI Security, an 8-year-old information security consulting firm. Bruck leads his security team with a successful 16-year background in IT management and senior engineering positions. He is also the developer and author of best practices that are becoming standards in the information security consulting business. He can be reached via www.baisecurity.netor by e-mail at mbruck@baisecurity.net.The opinions expressed in this column are those of the author, not of Entrepreneur.com. All answers are intended to be general in nature, without regard to specific geographical areas or circumstances, and should only be relied upon after consulting an appropriate expert, such as an attorney or accountant.last_img read more

CopacinoFujikado Helps Brands Navigate LGBTQ Marketing Beyond Pride Month

first_img Brand Pride GuideCopacino+FujikadoLGBTQ+ communityMarketing TechnologymicrositeNews Previous ArticleStepStone Acquires Majority of US Technology Provider AppcastNext ArticleCalendar-Based Scheduling Now Available for Geopointe on Salesforce AppExchange, the World’s Leading Enterprise Cloud Marketplace Copacino+Fujikado Helps Brands Navigate LGBTQ+ Marketing Beyond Pride Month Globe NewswireJuly 2, 2019, 5:52 pmJuly 2, 2019 Seattle Creative Agency’s LGBTQ+ Employees Spearhead Pride GuideCopacino+Fujikado, an independent creative agency in Seattle, Washington, announces the launch of its first-ever Brand Pride Guide, entitled “Rainbow with a Cause.” The guide takes the form of a microsite and offers tips to brands around how to use Pride flags and their respective colors in internal and external communications, generating increased awareness across the advertising and marketing industries beyond Pride Month.“We wanted to do something coming off of Pride that reflected our personal queer identities and our identity as an agency, while educating our peers on how to reach the LGBTQ+ community in an authentic way,” said John Line, Senior Account Director at Copacino+Fujikado.Marketing Technology News: Digital Communication Tools Leave Many Workers Feeling Squeezed out by Tech-Savvy Colleagues“As a queer person in advertising, I continually see my community asking brands to do better, but I rarely see an industry perspective on how to help brands make that progress,” said Caroline Henry, Senior Copywriter at Copacino+Fujikado. “We all know slapping a rainbow on your logo doesn’t cut it; you have to communicate exactly how you’re helping the LGBTQ+ community 365 a year.”“Rainbow with a Cause” aims to do just that, helping brands navigate marketing to the LGBTQ+ community in an authentic way. It covers the history of Pride, correct Pride flag usage, and how to ensure your brand’s efforts steer clear of  “Rainbow-Washing,” or using the Pride flag purely for publicity or profit, year-round. As the guide states, “LGBTQ+ consumers are savvy and painfully aware when a brand doesn’t dive any deeper than a pretty glitter exterior.”Marketing Technology News: Selligent Marketing Cloud Study Reveal Digital Marketers Struggle to Deliver Consistent Omnichannel ExperiencesThe idea originated from Copacino+Fujikado’s LGBTQ+ employees and came into fruition with the help of the agency’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion initiative group, EDGE, which stands for Empowering Diversity and Growing Equity. Founded in 2018, the initiative aims to empower everyone at Copacino+Fujikado and create a more diverse, equitable and inclusive culture at the agency, in its work, and beyond.Marketing Technology News: LivePerson Wins 2019 Artificial Intelligence Breakthrough Awardlast_img read more

UCPH researcher receives prize for research into brains cleaning system

first_img Source:https://healthsciences.ku.dk/news/2018/11/million-kroner-prize-to-ucph-researcher-for-revolutionary-discovery-of-the-brains-cleaning-system/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 8 2018Professor Maiken Nedergaard from the University of Copenhagen is this year’s recipient of the prestigious prize Stora Nordiska Pris awarded by the Eric K. Fernström Foundation. She receives the prize for her discovery of and research into the brain’s cleaning system, the glymphatic system.This year’s Stora Nordiska Pris, one of the largest medical awards in Scandinavia, goes to Professor Maiken Nedergaard from the University of Copenhagen and the University of Rochester. The prize is awarded by the Eric K. Fernström Foundation and comes with one million Swedish kroner.Maiken Nedergaard has been chosen as this year’s prize winner for her “revolutionary discovery of the brain’s own cleaning system, the glymphatic system. Her discovery and study hereof has increased our understanding of how the brain during sleep gets rid of harmful substances and thus protects itself from disease,” the foundation argues. Maiken Nedergaard, who is co-director of Center for Translational Neuromedicine (UCPH), is grateful for the prize and the recognition of her work.’There is no doubt that research is incredibly important for our future. I am very happy that private individuals and organizations invest in research and wish to honor nerds like me stuck in long-term projects that we often cannot see the end of. We really appreciate it,’ says Maiken Nedergaard.According to Maiken Nedergaard, who is president of the Danish Society for Neuroscience, research prizes are important because they bring focus on research.’The society is striving to attract the greatest talents to neuroscience. Neuroscience has never been more relevant than it is today. Now that we have become better at treating heart diseases and several types of cancer, dementia is the disease reducing the quality of life of our senior citizens’, she explains.Interest in Glial Cells Led to DiscoveryIn 2012 Maiken Nedergaard and her research group were the first to discover and describe the brain’s cleaning system, and they named it the glymphatic system. The system is partly similar to the lymphatic system in the rest of the body, hence the ‘lymphatic’, while the ‘g’ is for glial cells, which are responsible for the transportation of fluids. Among other things, the system plays a main role in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. It was Maiken Nedergaard’s interest in glial cells, the brain’s support cells, that led her to discover the glymphatic system, as she and her research group set out to understand glial cells’ role at organ level.’We simply began studying how the brain got rid of waste matter. It was a brand new, unknown system for transportation of water in the brain. Some aspects of the system had already been described, but no one had described the fact that fluids in the brain remove waste matter – mainly when we are asleep. We began by examining the cleaning system in animals subjected to anesthesia. And we were surprised to learn that the transportation of fluids had more or less stopped when we began studying animals who were awake. There is probably a good reason why we do not clean the brain while awake – how could the nerve cells work in a dishwasher?’, Maiken Nedergaard explains.Related StoriesNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaThe research of Maiken Nedergaard and her research group has paved the way for further work on the system by other researchers around the world, including two Scandinavian researchers, Per Eide from the University of Oslo and Vesa Kiviniemi from Oulo University. Their groups have done further research into the system and established the existence of the glymphatic system in humans. Per Eide has specifically studied the glymphatic system in a dementia disease called ‘normal pressure hydrocephalus’, while Vesa Kiviniemi has invented a new method for examining the system non-invasively using MRI. The researchers hope that Vesa Kiviniemi’s MRI method can be used to diagnose Alzheimer’s before the patient experiences dementia and there is still a chance of treating the disease.The Glymphatic System’s Role in CognitionGlial cells still interest Maiken Nedergaard. These days she is researching, among other things, how the glymphatic system may be able to drive fluid congestion in the brain following traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest. Another topic addressed by the group is the importance of the system to the brain and our cognitive abilities.’Glial cells in the human brain help make the brain capable of so much more than apes even – which I find incredibly interesting. How does something that is just a cleaning process also affect our human abilities? In the future we need to learn not just how the glymphatic system is turned on during sleep, but also how the system affects the way the brain works, our cognition and whether disruption of the glymphatic system contributes to mental health disorders like depression’, Maiken Nedergaard says.Stora Nordiska Pris is awarded on 7 November during a ceremony held in connection with Research Day in Lund in Sweden. Here Maiken Nedergaard will give a lecture on her research.Research Day is organized by the Faculty of Medicine at Lund University, Region Skåne and the Eric K. Fernström Foundation. The annual Stora Nordiska Pris has been awarded to Nordic researchers since 1979.Researchers who have previously received the prize include Professor Jiri Lukas and Professor Jens Juul Holst from the University of Copenhagen.last_img read more

Purdue engineers develop tiny glutamate sensors for spinal cord injuries

first_img Source:https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2019/Q1/implant-to-better-track-brain-chemical-gone-rogue-after-neurotrauma.html Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 28 2019Your chances of getting a nasty migraine increase following a spinal cord injury, thanks to a chemical messenger in the brain that spikes to toxic levels, past studies have suggested.For treatment to get any better, researchers need to catch that split-second spike in action and closely follow its path of destruction.Purdue University engineers have built a tiny, flexible sensor that is faster and more precise than past attempts at tracking this chemical, called glutamate. The sensor, an implantable device on the spinal cord, is primarily a research tool for testing in animal models, but could find future clinical use as a way to monitor whether a drug for neurotrauma or brain disease is working.The group’s work appears in a forthcoming issue of Biosensors and Bioelectronics.”When you feel like you’re running a fever, it doesn’t matter when you check your temperature – it will probably be the same for several hours. But a glutamate spike is so fast that if you don’t capture it at that moment, you miss the whole opportunity to get data,” said Riyi Shi, a professor of neuroscience and biomedical engineering in Purdue’s Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering.Impact, such as from a car accident or tackle in football, can injure the spinal cord – also injuring the nerve structures that transport glutamate, which sends signals to excite nerve tissue for performing functions such as learning and memorizing.Damaged nerve structures means that loads of glutamate leak out into spaces outside of cells, over-exciting and damaging them. Brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, also show elevated levels of glutamate.Devices so far either haven’t been sensitive enough to detect glutamate, fast enough to capture its spike or affordable enough for long-term research projects.Purdue researchers are addressing these issues through implantable sensors that they have 3D printed and laser-micromachined – processes that are already used regularly in the lab and industry. A YouTube video is available at https://youtu.be/hyn9SM1wdz0.Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to help”We wanted to create a low-cost and very fast way to build these sensors so that we can easily provide researchers with a means to measure glutamate levels in vivo,” said Hugh Lee, a Purdue assistant professor of biomedical engineering, who focuses on implantable microtechnologies.The technique allows researchers to rapidly change the size, shape and orientation of the sensors and then test in animal models without having to go through the more expensive process of microfabrication.Measuring levels in vivo would help researchers to study how spinal cord injuries happen, as well as how brain diseases develop.”How big of a problem is a migraine? Is too much glutamate really behind the pain, or is it that the system that cleans up glutamate is down?” Shi said.The researchers implanted the device into the spinal cord of an animal model and then injured the cord to observe a spike. The device captured the spike immediately, whereas for current devices, researchers have had to wait 30 minutes to get data after damaging the spinal cord.In the future, the researchers plan to create a way for the biosensors to self-clear of inflammatory cells that the body recruits to protect itself. These cells typically form a fibrous capsule around the biosensor, which blocks its sensitivity.The technology could also allow for implanting more sensors along the spinal cord, which would help researchers to know how far glutamate spreads and how quickly.The researchers have filed a patent application for this device with the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. The work was supported by the Global Research Outreach program of the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, the National Institutes of Health, and sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation under grant CNS-1726865.This research aligns with Purdue’s Giant Leaps celebration, acknowledging the university’s global advancements made in health, longevity and quality of life as part of Purdue’s 150th anniversary. This is one of the four themes of the yearlong celebration’s Ideas Festival, designed to showcase Purdue as an intellectual center solving real-world issues.last_img read more

Doctoral thesis focuses on the role of oxidative stress in Wolfram syndrome

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)May 29 2019In the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Tartu, the first animal testings were conducted using antioxidant peptides designed and synthesized by scientists in Tartu, which may reduce oxidative stress. Oxidative stress also develops with a rare incurable genetic disease called Wolfram syndrome and it is studied profoundly by scientists all over the world.Doctoral candidate of the Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine at the University of Tartu, Rando Porosk, explained that oxidative stress is a condition where the reactive species, such as free radicals, dominate over the antioxidant defense system, and this may cause tissue damage as a result, for example. Source:Estonian Research Council Related StoriesStudy reveals long-term benefits of stress urinary incontinence surgeryDogs and cats relieve academic stress and lift students’ mood, according to a new studyGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”In his doctoral thesis titled “The Role of Oxidative Stress in Wolfram Syndrome 1 and Hypothermia”, Porosk studied the role of oxidative stress in the case of mild hypothermia or reduced body temperature as well as rare Wolfram syndrome. The latter is caused by a wolframin gene defect which also causes diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optical nerve atrophy and neurodegenerative disorders. A person suffering from this syndrome has diabetes as well as he/she will be blind and deaf.According to the doctoral candidate, there is knowledge of Wolfram syndrome in the case of wolframin deficiency, as intracellular endoplasmic stress, as well as oxidative stress occurs. “We described the level of oxidative stress more profoundly than ever before in the model of mice suffering from Wolfram syndrome constructed by us and showed how the antioxidant UPF peptides designed by us decrease oxidative stress in various tissues.”In Porosk’s doctoral thesis, the animal model has been described better when compared with earlier ones. This animal model can now be used in further research for describing Wolfram syndrome. “Profound description of metabolism provides information for further studies on a protein with hitherto unknown biofunction which is also wolframin that causes Wolfram syndrome. This way, its biofunction can be described even more profoundly.”The mild hypothermia is used quite a lot in clinical practice for avoiding tissue damage. Right now, it is not exactly known what the protective hypothermia mechanism is about. “We showed in the research that mild hypothermia causes a stress response in various cell lines,” said Porosk in conclusion.center_img Oxidative stress is the cause for concern primarily for those whose organism has more reactive species or whose antioxidant defense system is weaker. Deficient defense system may also result from the scarcity of certain vitamins.”Rando Porosk, doctoral candidate of the Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine at the University of Tartulast_img read more

Five things to watch out for on December 26 2018

first_imgstrike Published on banking air pollution COMMENT COMMENTS The cricket Test match between Australia and India will take place on Wednesday Australia’s Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG). The match will see Rohit Sharma, who would be returning after an injury, and Mayank Agarwal at the top of the order. Mayank will be making his Test debut at the MCG with the four-match series level at 1-1.Close to 1 million employees of various banks, including private lenders, have called for a one-day strike on Wednesday to protest against the proposed amalgamation of Vijaya Bank and Dena Bank with Bank of Baroda. The strike call comes on the heels of an officers union of state-run banks observing a day-long strike last Friday on similar grounds along with the demand for immediate settlement of the wage negotiations.Flipkart’s Mobiles Bonanza sale will start on Wednesday and will go on till Saturday, December 29. It will offers buyers discounts on numerous smartphones for one last time before the year ends. The list includes the Realme 2 Pro, Asus ZenFone Max Pro M1, Honor 9N and the Nokia 5.1 Plus.A special court in the United Kingdom (UK) will pronounce its order on Wednesday regarding an application filed by the Enforcement Directorate (ED) seeking declaration of beleaguered businessman Vijay Mallya as a “fugitive economic offender” and confiscation of his properties. Mallya is currently facing charges of financial irregularities.Factories located in the main industrial of the Delhi-NCR region will remain closed on Wednesday as per the recommendations received by the Environment Pollution (Prevention and Control) Authority from the Central Pollution Control Board Task force. The decision came amidst deteriorating air quality in Delhi and the surrounding regions. SHARE SHARE EMAIL Vijay Mallya. File photo   –  File photo December 26, 2018 SHARE cricket Flipkartlast_img read more

Karnataka mulls geographical indication policy

first_imgSHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENT Published on May 03, 2019 The Karnataka government is planning to come out with a GI (geographical indication) Policy in the State, according to an official of the State government.In an informal chat with mediapersons on the sidelines of an interactive meeting with exporters at the Kanara Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KCCI) in Mangaluru on Friday, SR Satheesha, Managing Director of the Bengaluru-based Visvesvaraya Trade Promotion Centre (a Karnataka government organisation), said the State has 45 GI products in different sectors, including handicraft, horticulture, etc. Karnataka has maximum number of GI products among other states in the country.Stating that VTPC (Visvesvaraya Trade Promotion Centre ) is working on a strategy document on GI products in the State, he said: “We will have focussed meeting with the respective GI holders in the state. We will visit them to understand their issues, and to provide interventions wherever needed.”Highlighting the instances of gradual diminishing of some GI products in the State, he said the number of artisans producing ‘Udupi sari’ is coming down gradually. In such a situation, GI policy will help provide focused training programmes and skill upgradation facilities to the stakeholders of GI products.Apart from this, the policy will also want to make GI products competitive in the domestic and international markets. Considering this, plans are there to introduce concepts such as ‘GI tourism’, ‘GI exhibitions’, and ‘GI stores’ at airports, and also to develop ‘GI cluster’ in the State.Asked if any other State has taken initiative to launch a GI policy, he said Karnataka will be the first State to come out with a GI policy.Being niche in their segments, GI products have a lot of potential in the market. Somehow, they are not being marketed properly, Satheesha said. COMMENTS SHARE patent, copyright and trademark Karnatakalast_img read more