Another Housing Bubble Ahead?

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Fannie Mae Survey Reports Near-Record High in Purchase Sentiment Next: The Future of a Career in Appraisals Another Housing Bubble Ahead? Subscribe Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: Bubble Home Prices Homeowners Houisng mortgage About Author: Seth Welborn The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. center_img Bubble Home Prices Homeowners Houisng mortgage 2019-06-07 Seth Welborn Research from the Black Knight indicates that the current demand for houses is largely driven by families seeking to purchase homes and not by speculators, which, according to the Urban Institute, means that we are at less risk of entering a housing bubble.Urban Institute’s analysis of Black Knight’s house price index (HPI) reveals that home prices appear to be losing momentum. In comparison that during the last housing bubble, growth in the investment component of HPI was substantially larger, “reflecting reckless lending and speculative homebuying,” said Andrew M. Neal, Urban Institute Senior Research Associate.“Investment-driven demand for housing returned in 2012 as buyers with strong credit profiles and deep pockets snapped up millions of foreclosed homes at rock-bottom prices,” Neal said. “Not surprisingly, peak growth of the investment component in 2013 (4.2%) far outpaced the consumption component (2.2%), although to a lesser extent than during the bubble.”Home prices slowed from 6.8% year over year growth in February 2018 to 3.6% in March, while home prices have hit historic highs in nominal terms. This means the return for investment for homeowners has been small, and a family buying a home at today’s prices will do slightly better than inflation, however, they shouldn’t expect outsize equity gains. Neal notes that with these trends in mind, potential homeowners making the move to ownership need to consider the absolute cost of owning versus renting, including maintenance costs, taxes and insurance, and foregone interest on the down payment. They should also consider that homeownership provides a hedge against future housing inflation or rent increases.“More importantly, these data should comfort those worried about another housing market crash,” said Neal. “Compared with the 2005–2007 bubble, when the HPI was driven mostly by speculative buying, the HPI today is driven mostly by families wanting to buy homes to live in.”Find the full release from the Urban Institute here. Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Another Housing Bubble Ahead? Share 2Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago  Print This Post June 7, 2019 4,581 Views Sign up for DS News Daily in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, Newslast_img read more

Law Professionals Discuss Safety Measures for Servicers

first_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Share Save Home / Daily Dose / Law Professionals Discuss Safety Measures for Servicers Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Law Professionals Discuss Safety Measures for Servicers Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago  Print This Post Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Subscribe Previous: Re-Evaluating the Payroll Protection Program Next: Pace of Loans Entering Forbearance Slows Tagged with: Legal League in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agocenter_img Industry leaders converged digitally to unpack the latest critical regulatory changes, COVID-19 updates, and proactive strategies at the Legal League 100’s Virtual Servicer Summit. “The Legal League team has done a tremendous job putting this Summit together,” said Roy Diaz, Managing Shareholder, Diaz Anselmo Lindberg, P.A. in his opening remarks. “This has been a tremendous challenge, as you can imagine, and they’ve done a great job bringing everybody together and I’m really excited about the prospect of doing our summit on time and virtually.”Participating panelists included Christopher L. Carman, Litigation and Compliance Counsel, BSI Financial Services; Candace Russell, VP Post-Sale, Carrington Mortgage; Ryan Bourgeois, General Counsel—Partner, BDF Law Group; and John A. Dunnery, VP, Government Loan Servicing, Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC.In a Q&A with Stephen Hladik, Partner, Hladik, Onorato & Federman, LLP; and Gagan Sharma, President and CEO, BSI Financial Services, Inc discussed forbearance issues and how servicers can prepare.“As we think about what the post-forbearance scenario looks like, ramping up and preparing for that becomes important,” said Sharma. “We know that there are going to be a significant number of borrowers who are going to need that help and assistance. Trying to do as much as we can ahead of time is going to be important”Also, William R. Emmons, Lead Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, provided the afternoon keynote, discussing the state of the economy and what it will take to end the COVID-19 crisis.“Very few of the economic sectors will be spared in this recession,” Emmons notes. “In fact, some, I think, will be devastated.”Emmons notes that the U.S. is still “miles away” from herd immunity, meaning the economy may be closed again. Despite the Fed’s best efforts, he notes, real estate markets are still being hit.“I expect real estate values to decline,” he states, adding that large scale mortgage forbearance delays the inevitable.“Now more than ever it is vital that leaders within the mortgage servicing industry come together to not only discuss the challenges but more importantly, solutions during these trying times,” said Lindsay Wolf, Director of Membership Operations for Five Star Global. May 14, 2020 1,047 Views About Author: Seth Welborn Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Legal League 2020-05-14 Seth Welborn Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more

Sage: Badgers’ season ends due to poor final performance

first_imgIn times of defeat, it is easy to look at everything that was working against you.Blame the opponent, or the coach or look back at previous performances and wonder. Fault the fans for being no-shows, or injuries or question the outside powers for putting you in a predicament in the first place.The list can run on and on.And for the Wisconsin women’s hockey team and all those who support the Badger ladies, this is a very easy road to take.For the first time since the expansion of the NCAA tournament to an eight-team field and with head coach Mark Johnson behind the bench, the Badgers have not advanced to the Big Dance. The team has earned a spot every year since 2005, except 2010, when Johnson and several Badger players spent the year competing in the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. However, Sunday night at approximately 5:04 p.m., UW learned that streak had ended, and its 2012-2013 season was finished.Wisconsin finished the regular season tied for second place in the nation’s toughest women’s hockey conference. And coming from the conference with a Minnesota team that has yet to be touched, a 23-10-2 record come selection time for UW was by no means unqualified.So why are the Badgers no longer competing?We could criticize their early season performance. The Badgers opened the season with an unimpressive 3-3-2 record that had many question the ability of this team. While they silenced questions by turning their play around to earn 19 more wins – and heading into the final game, UW was riding an eight-game winning streak – a few more wins earlier in the season could have made the difference.Should we question injuries? Maybe if senior defenseman Stefanie McKeough and sophomore Brittany Ammerman weren’t sidelined for the season UW would have won more games.Then there is the easiest to blame of them all, the tournament selection process.Heading into the matchup between the Badgers and North Dakota last Friday, it was clear the teams were playing for much more than a spot in the WCHA tournament championship game. They were fighting it out for a place in the NCAA tournament, which the rankings correctly showed only had room for one.Yes, I agree, it seems wrong that just two teams from the WCHA would make it into the tournament. The conference has taken all 12 national championship titles since the tournament was first played in 2001 after all. But in winning every conference game, the Golden Gophers hurt the group as a whole by inflicting more losses on the other WCHA teams this season, making them less competitive ranking wise on the national level.This would be the easy, and in many ways, the justified outlook on this season’s conclusion.But don’t forget to take one hard look at the team itself and realize Wisconsin’s performance last Friday against UND is to blame.The Badgers knew exactly what was at stake in what turned out to be their final game against North Dakota and simply failed to execute.Last Wednesday, Johnson and several Badgers spoke with confidence about what they needed to do to come away with a win, and their game plan seemed straightforward: continue doing what they have done to win the past eight games that brought them to the tournament semifinal game and don’t give UND unneeded opportunities by taking penalties.But when the team stepped onto the ice Friday afternoon in Minneapolis, adorned in their usual white with cardinal red, the play on the ice from those jerseys showed no resemblance to what fans had witnessed in the recent past.In the first two minutes of each period Wisconsin took a penalty, allowing North Dakota to set a pace each time out. And while there were no power play goals, UND established a rhythm in their own favor that was clean, simple and fast, leaving Wisconsin chasing UND for most of the game and not playing their own game.Wisconsin – a team that may not score as many goals as it would like, but had a shot output of more than 30 shots on goal in 26 of its 34 games – uncharacteristically put up just eight shots on goal in the first 40 minutes of play. Where was the Brianna Decker-Madison Packer-Karley Sylvester line that had been finding ways to the net?After UND took a 2-0 lead with goals in the first and early in the third, Wisconsin finally began playing like the Badger team that managed to turn a .500 start of the season around to win 14 of its last 17 games with pure domination and finesse. Firing 16 shots in the third period finally earned UW a goal. But still down a score with 3:54 left in the game, another penalty 1:02 later killed all hope and momentum. When the final horn sounded, UW had been outplayed by its rival.My respect for this team runs deep, and I would have liked to see what the squad could do in the NCAA tournament. An upset against Minnesota was my personal wish. But at the end of the day, or season rather, it was Wisconsin’s final performance that should take the most thought when players, coaches, family and fans look back on how things unfolded.Caroline is a junior majoring in Journalism and Political Science. Think UW’s early exit was justified? Send her an email at [email protected] or tweet her @caroline_sage.last_img read more