RSF’s calls for overhaul of Gabonese media’s “executioner”

first_imgNews The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa GabonAfrica Condemning abusesMedia independence Freedom of expression Communiqué of the decision of the High Authority for Communication (HAC) to suspend the newspaper Fraternité, by its deputy spokesman, Mr. Mouwaka Ngonga, on June 20, 2019. Credit: Gabon Television Group January 24, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information News November 27, 2020 Find out more After another media outlet’s arbitrary suspension by Gabon’s High Authority for Communication (HAC), Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for an overhaul of the way this media regulator functions so that it fulfils its original role of defending press freedom instead of the government’s interests. Organisation Gabonese journalist could spend New Year’s Eve in prison RSF_en center_img News June 26, 2019 RSF’s calls for overhaul of Gabonese media’s “executioner” Receive email alerts Follow the news on Gabon to go further Dubbed the “AXE” by Gabon’s journalists because of its propensity for “executing” media outlets by closing them down, the HAC lived up to its reputation again on 20 June by ordering the newspaper Fraternité to stop publishing for a month because of a 13 June article headlined “Who runs Gabon?” that questioned President Ali Bongo’s ability to govern since a stroke last October.Claiming that the article contained “malicious, defamatory, insulting and mendacious insinuations” causing “harm to the president’s honour and dignity,” the HAC also demanded the immediate removal of the offending issue from newsstands and other points of sale. Fraternité told RSF it intended to appeal to the HAC against this decision and might refer the matter to the courts.“Since it started operating a year ago the HAC has ordered a dozen arbitrary suspensions, preventing various media outlets from publishing or broadcasting for a combined total of 28 months,” said Arnaud Froger, the head of RSF’s Africa desk. “This is a disastrous record. This regulator is clearly being used to defend the regime’s interests and inflict punishments on the media instead of fulfilling its most important mission: to defend press freedom. Only a complete overhaul of its functioning and composition would allow journalists the freedom to speak their minds and serve the public interest by covering all subjects, even the most politically sensitive ones.”Created by government decree on 23 February 2018 to replace the National Council for Communication (CNC), the HAC is a supposedly independent government offshoot but seven of its nine members are appointed by the ruling authorities, and it inflicts almost systematic sanctions on media outlets that criticize the president or his close associates.In November 2018, the daily newspaper L’Aube was suspended for three months for referring to the president’s health. Five months later, in April 2019, it was suspended again, this time for six months, for publishing a spoof interview with President Bongo’s former chief of staff as an April Fool’s joke, and for an interview with Désiré Enamé, the editor of Echos du Nord, a newspaper that has also been suspended several times, in which he condemned the “extraordinary persecution of targeted newspapers.”Gabon is ranked 115th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index, seven places lower than in 2018. Weekly seized from Gabon’s newsstands Reports GabonAfrica Condemning abusesMedia independence Freedom of expression December 31, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

Royal Bank of Scotland Loses Bid to Have FHFA’s MBS Suit Dismissed

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Royal Bank of Scotland Loses Bid to Have FHFA’s MBS Suit Dismissed The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago August 25, 2015 2,044 Views in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Secondary Market Tagged with: FHFA Lawsuits Mortgage-Backed Securities Royal Bank of Scotland Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago FHFA Lawsuits Mortgage-Backed Securities Royal Bank of Scotland 2015-08-25 Brian Honea Royal Bank of Scotland Loses Bid to Have FHFA’s MBS Suit Dismissed About Author: Brian Honea A federal judge in Connecticut has denied a bid by the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the FHFA accusing the bank of misleading Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the sale of $32 billion worth of residential mortgage-backed securities before the financial crisis, according to media reports.FHFA claims that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac relied on false and misleading statements made by RBS when purchasing the mortgage-backed securities, causing the GSEs to suffer massive losses. Reports surfaced in early July that the FHFA, conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac since 2008, is seeking up to $13 billion in damages from RBS in the lawsuit.RBS attempted to have the lawsuit dismissed on the grounds that the FHFA waited too long to sue. The suit was filed in 2011, three years after the financial crisis. U.S. District Judge Alvin Thompson in the U.S. District Court, District of Connecticut ruled that the time limit for filing the suit had been extended by a law passed in the wake of the financial crisis, according to a report from Reuters.The FHFA said in an email to DS News that it would not be commenting on the judge’s ruling or the case. A spokesperson from RBS could not immediately be reached for comment.RBS was one of 18 lenders sued by the FHFA in 2011 to recoup U.S. taxpayer costs following the government’s $187.5 billion bailout of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in 2008. Out of the 18 lenders the FHFA sued, 16 of them settled for a combined total of about $17 billion. Nomura Holdings took FHFA to trial in March for a case in which RBS was also a defendant. Nomura was found liable for deceiving the GSEs in the sale of $2 billion worth of mortgage-backed securities and was ordered to pay $806 million to the FHFA. 2008. The bank has appealed the verdict. The case against RBS is the last of the FHFA’s 18 lawsuits that has not either been settled or completed a trial.In June 2014, RBS agreed to pay $99.5 million to settle a separate FHFA suit claiming that the bank sold more than $2 billion worth of faulty mortgage-backed securities to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac between 2005 and 2007, the years of the “housing bubble” in the U.S.center_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Previous: PRIA Awards Two Ernst Publishing-Sponsored Scholarships Next: Are Single-Family Property Renters More Likely to Buy a Home Than Those in Apartments?  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Related Articles Subscribelast_img read more